From the monthly archives: April 2012

It’s Finals Time

On April 23, 2012 By JETLaw

JETLaw blog readers, please excuse the brief blogging hiatus as our authors focus on final exams over the next few weeks. We will be back in full force soon!

– The JETLaw Staff

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If you are searching for the a New York Times bestseller on Amazon, you may want to double check what you are purchasing.  It is not uncommon for a book search to result in a series of titles that are strikingly similar to the novel that friends are telling you is “a must read.”  [...]

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Have you ever been distracted at work, aimlessly looking through blogs, Facebook, or Twitter to help you make it to the end of a long Monday? Most people have found themselves in this situation at some point, although probably few have considered the possibility that their internet browsing could be deemed a federal crime. [...]

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Crookes v. Newton, 2011 SCC 47, October 19th 2011.

Single Sentence Summary

A majority of the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that a hyperlink, by itself, cannot be defamatory, as it cannot be seen as a “publication” of the content to which it refers.

Legal Context

To successfully plead defamation the [...]

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Love it or hate it, Tebow-Mania is invading New York.  Quarterback Tim Tebow, whose popularity soared last year as he led the Denver Broncos on an improbable run from a 1 and 4 record to a playoff win over the Steelers, was traded to the New York Jets on March [...]

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On March 27, the National Football League Players’ Association (NFLPA) voted to get rid of a rule prohibiting certified player-agents from contacting football players at NCAA institutions until 3 years after the graduation of their high school class.  Basically, this rule normally prohibited agents registered with the NFLPA – necessary to represent NFL [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On April 16, 2012 By JETLaw

Excerpts from the Justice Department’s lawsuit against Apple and several book publishers. Ninth Circuit rules that checking Facebook at work or violating a website’s terms of use is not a criminal offense. Parents’ lawsuit against Apple for In-App purchases of minor children moves forward.

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As the social networking market continues to grow and evolve, consumers are increasingly presented with new platforms through which they can document and share their lives. The expansion of this market, particularly over the past few years, has been nothing short of remarkable. Websites like Facebook and LinkedIn have become nearly mandatory for young [...]

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The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is on a roll right now. Alabama is the reigning king of college football. Same for Kentucky in men’s college basketball and South Carolina in college baseball. An SEC-alum is the reigning Super Bowl MVP and another recently won the [...]

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Concerns about cyberbullying have reached an all-time high recently, gaining traction from the decision in the highly publicized Tyler Clementi case.  While non-profit organizations like stopcyberbullying.org list prevention techniques like educating children and raising awareness, some state governments may opt to take a more aggressive step that could end up [...]

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