Silk Road Recap

On March 10, 2015 By Michael Griffin

One month out, commentators are still digesting the conviction of Silk Road creator Ross Ulbricht. The case raises questions about the government’s investigations tactics, the lawyers’ trial strategies, and the broader implications for privacy, the internet, and the public.

As the JETLaw Blog previously reported, the Silk Road was intended to be a decentralized [...]

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Recently, the soap opera The Young and the Restless has been in the spotlight for drama that has unfolded off camera. That drama has manifested itself as a legal battle between Sony Pictures Television, Bell Dramatic Serial Company, Bell Philip Television Production Inc., and CBS Corporation and Victoria Rowell, actress and fourteen-year veteran on [...]

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Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Parking Next to Picasso

On March 5, 2015 By Robyn Taylor

Where would you find 271 previously unseen works by Pablo Picasso? In a garage, of course. Picasso’s former electrician, Pierre Le Guennec, and his wife, Danielle, are accused of handling over 271 stolen Picasso masterpieces. The works have been sitting in Le Guennec’s garage for over forty years. Le Guennec contends that Picasso’s [...]

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Proposed legislation in China–under the guise of counter terrorism–has US analysts on edge about potential protectionism or infringement on trade secrets of US tech firms. The proposed legislation is the latest development in the Chinese government’s attempts to regulate high tech companies, after regulators have enacted rules that will require firms that provide banking [...]

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Is Streaming Speech?

On March 3, 2015 By Chastity Bobo

Pandora had long thought it could use pre-1972 recordings free of charge, but the rock band The Turtles are trying to prove them wrong. Last week, Judge Philip S. Gutierrez denied Pandora’s motion to dismiss.  This is not the first time the signers from the Turtles, suing as Flo & Eddie, Inc., have been successful against [...]

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Once every three years, the United States Copyright Office allows for the submission of proposed exemptions to Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Section 1201 prohibits individuals from circumventing a technological measure that controls access to a protected work even if the reason for doing so is otherwise legal. The exemptions [...]

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The day of the writing of this blog post, Vanderbilt University–yes, the one situated in Nashville, Tennessee–is closed for its second straight Snow Day.  While frigid temperatures and power outages pose incidental hazards, the main reason for closing shops and schools today is hazardous travel conditions.  And, as far as I know, the overwhelming proportion [...]

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Cyberspace is the new “Wild West,” according to President Obama, but the government can’t be the only sheriff in town. President Obama addressed these remarks to a crowd of tech industry leaders at a White House cybersecurity summit last week. He also signed an executive order on February 13, outlining a path for [...]

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China’s anti-trust investigation of the American chip maker Qualcomm came to an end when the chip giant agreed to pay a record fine of about $975 million last Monday. According to the decision issued by China’s National Development and Reform Commission, the royalties Qualcomm collected from Chinese smartphone manufactures were “unfair” and “excessively [...]

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