Guest post by Mark Edward Blankenship Jr.

In creating the album “Hip-Hop Is Dead”, Nasir Jones, better known by his stage name Nas, postulated that hip-hop artists can help rebuild America by having more control in their music in response to a dying culture and a decline in innovation and political outreach. Yet, in [...]

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The landscape of collegiate sports is ever-evolving. Collegiate athletes are bigger, stronger, and faster than in previous eras and are being recruited at much younger ages than before. As more talent flows into athletic programs, colleges and the NCAA have been able to profit not only from the abilities of student-athletes, but also from their [...]

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Several federal circuits are tackling the issue whether the Government’s authority to search persons and property at the border, without a warrant, and often, without any suspicion, includes individuals’ electronic devices. The Fourth and Ninth Circuits have held that the Fourth Amendment requires at least reasonable suspicion for forensic searches of electronic devices [...]

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More often than not, it takes years (if not decades) for the significance of a Supreme Court decision to come to light. This was not the case when the Court handed down its decision in Murphy v. NCAA this past May.  Immediately following the declaring of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) as [...]

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Bird Electric Scooters: Ready For Flight?

On September 16, 2018 By anbakalar

If you spent any time in a major U.S. city this summer, you likely witnessed an electric scooter zooming down the sidewalk. Maybe you were even riding the scooter. Bird, one of the better-known electric scooter start-ups, claims to have facilitated over 1 million rides within a year of its launch.

Electric scooter start-ups [...]

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Putting the ‘AI’ in Legal Aid

On September 7, 2018 By rblaik

Despite America’s 1,335,963 active lawyers, the majority of moderate-income individuals and most individuals living in poverty do not receive legal representation. One source reports that nearly one million individuals seeking civil legal aid are turned away because of inadequate resources. In New York City, 99% of tenants are unrepresented in eviction proceedings.

For years [...]

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There are few people who can say a major historical event has happened inside of them. Brian Madeux is one of them.

Some context: Madeux has a rare genetic condition called Hunter syndrome, a disease caused by a missing chromosome in his DNA. Without that chromosome, Madeux’s body cannot break down complex sugar molecules, [...]

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The legal implications of self-driving cars are hard to ignore following the first death related to the emerging technology. After an Uber test drive where neither the autonomous vehicle nor the human driver slowed for an Arizonian pedestrian, the company halted testing in the state as well as in San Francisco, Pittsburgh, and [...]

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Guest post by Gilad Yadin

When I began studying the legal implications of virtual reality technology, seeing or using an actual virtual reality system required access to a research laboratory or a specialized training facility; virtual reality was something most people associated with science fiction, it seemed futuristic and far-fetched. A few years ago, [...]

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May It Please the Court…and Facebook?

On March 24, 2018 By mtgalloway

On February 7, 2018, Florida made history as the first state supreme court to live stream its oral arguments on Facebook.

Florida’s state courts have a history of being early adopters of new technology and its role in the courtroom.  While not the first to permit electronic media coverage of court [...]

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