Cell phones have become an unquestionably ubiquitous part of everyday life for a large majority of Americans. Many take their phones with them everywhere and use them for numerous functions throughout the course of their day. Consequently people often inadvertently or purposefully store a host of personal information on such devices. The Supreme Court [...]

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Congress took another step this week in ensuring that we all have safe rides home on Saturday nights. A group of Congressional Democrats penned a letter to the CEOs of Uber, Sidecar, and Lyft demanding that the companies require their drivers to undergo more thorough background checks. This letter comes in the wake of [...]

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Feeling nostalgic is not new for the average 90′s kid. Buzzfeed and other sites frequently put out lists and reminders of what children experienced in the 90′s and 00′s. One site brought actual television shows from Nickelodeon to your computer streaming. Nickreboot did more just remind the visiter that they used [...]

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Dethroning the Tyrant of Numbers

On March 12, 2015 By Daniel Ward

Where are statistics and principled probabilistic thinking in law and legal education? Many law students shudder at the thought of any sort of computational mathematics or mathematical reasoning, and I have often heard my fellow students repeat the old joking excuse when anything numbers-related comes up in class: “I went to law school so I [...]

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In the past few years, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has received numerous trademark applications for phrases created from political and social movements. Currently, the USPTO is considering two trademark applications for “Je Suis Charlie,” a phrase created in response to the terrorist attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo, in [...]

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Silk Road Recap

On March 10, 2015 By Michael Griffin

One month out, commentators are still digesting the conviction of Silk Road creator Ross Ulbricht. The case raises questions about the government’s investigations tactics, the lawyers’ trial strategies, and the broader implications for privacy, the internet, and the public.

As the JETLaw Blog previously reported, the Silk Road was intended to be a decentralized [...]

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Recently, the soap opera The Young and the Restless has been in the spotlight for drama that has unfolded off camera. That drama has manifested itself as a legal battle between Sony Pictures Television, Bell Dramatic Serial Company, Bell Philip Television Production Inc., and CBS Corporation and Victoria Rowell, actress and fourteen-year veteran on [...]

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Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Parking Next to Picasso

On March 5, 2015 By Robyn Taylor

Where would you find 271 previously unseen works by Pablo Picasso? In a garage, of course. Picasso’s former electrician, Pierre Le Guennec, and his wife, Danielle, are accused of handling over 271 stolen Picasso masterpieces. The works have been sitting in Le Guennec’s garage for over forty years. Le Guennec contends that Picasso’s [...]

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Proposed legislation in China–under the guise of counter terrorism–has US analysts on edge about potential protectionism or infringement on trade secrets of US tech firms. The proposed legislation is the latest development in the Chinese government’s attempts to regulate high tech companies, after regulators have enacted rules that will require firms that provide banking [...]

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