2008-2009 Symposium

Intellectual Property Roundtable: User-Generated Content, Social Networking and Virtual Worlds

November 14-15, 2008 at Vanderbilt Law School

8-8:30 a.m. Breakfast

8:30-9 a.m. Opening Remarks: Associate Dean Erin O’Hara, Professor Steven Hetcher, and Sara Beth Myers, Editor, Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law

9-10:30 a.m. – Panel 1

“Virtual Women,” Ann Bartow, University of South Carolina
Discussants: Daniel Gervais, Vanderbilt, and Christine Farley, Washington College of Law, American University

“Three First Amendment Puzzles in Second Life: Scripting, Schooling, and Selling Stuff,” Mark Blitz, Oklahoma City University
Discussants: Lisa Ramsey, University of San Diego, and Christopher Yoo, University of Pennsylvania

“From the Mouths of Babes: Protecting Child Authors from Themselves,” Julie Cromer, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Discussants: Suzanne Kessler, Vanderbilt, and Mark Schultz, Oklahoma City University

10:30-10:45 a.m. Break

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Panel 2

“The Attention Economy,” Deven Desai, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Discussants: Chris Yoo, University of Pennsylvania, and Josh Fairfield, Indiana University Bloomington

“Net- ordering: Conceptualizing Governance in Social Media,” Niva Elkin-Koren, University of Haifa
Discussants: Mike Carroll, Villanova University, and Estelle Derclaye, University of Nottingham

“Patenting Games, or Baker v Selden Revisited,” Shubha Ghosh, University of Wisconsin
Discussants: Scott Boone, Appalachian School of Law, and Jerry Reichmann, Duke Law School

12:15-1:30 p.m. Lunch

1:30-3 p.m. Panel 3

“Real Spaces: The Proxemics, Chronemics, and Haptics of Virtual Worlds and Social Networking,” Llew Gibbons, University of Toledo
Discussants: Deborah Halbert, Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii, and Shubha Ghosh, University of Wisconsin

“Why Wikipedia Will Fail,” Eric Goldman, Santa Clara Law
Discussants: Mike Carroll and David Post

“The Magic Circle,” Josh Fairfield, Indiana University Bloomington
Discussants: David Post, Temple University, and Peter Yu, Drake University

3:00-3:15 p.m. Break

3:15-4:45 p.m. Panel 4

“Mass Culture and the Culture of the Masses: A Manifesto for User-Generated Rights,” Deborah Halbert, Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii
Discussants: Steve Hetcher, Vanderbilt, and Doris Long, John Marshall Law School

“Virtual Property and Intellectual Property,” Greg Lastowka, Rutgers School of Law
Discussants: Scott Boone, Appalachian School of Law, and Yee Fen Lim, National University of Singapore

“Two Notions of Online Privacy: Personal Information and Online Social Networks,” Avner Levin, Ryerson University
Discussants: David Post, Temple University, and Daniel Gervais, Vanderbilt

4:45-5 p.m. Wrap up, restroom break, to limo

5:00-5:15 En route to destination

5:15-6:30 p.m. Cocktails at Alice and David Randall’s home

6:30-7 p.m. En route to destination

7-9 p.m. Dinner at The Standard at the Smith House

9 p.m. – Back to Hotel or night out in Nashville

Saturday, November 15, 2008

8:30-9 a.m. Breakfast

9-11 a.m. Panel 5

“YouTube and Sharing: Competing Business and Cultural Models in the Digital Era,” Funmi Arewa, Northwestern University
Discussants: Mark Schultz, Southern Illinois University, and Suzanne Kessler, Vanderbilt

“Fraud in Virtual Worlds: Virtual World Providers Hiding behind EULAs and Virtual World Rules,” Yee Fen Lim, National University of Singapore
Discussants: Scott Boone, Appalachian School of Law, and Peter Yu, Drake University School of Law

“User Generated Content: The Mythology of Difference,” Doris Long, John Marshall Law School
“WikiOrder without WikiLaw,” Salil Mehra, Temple University
Discussants: Eric Goldman, University of California-Santa Clara, and Niva Elkin-Koren, University of Haifa

11-11:15 a.m. Break

11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Panel 6

“Endorsement, Identity, and Social Marketing,” William McGeveran, University of Minnesota
Discussants: Christine Farley, Washington College of Law, American University, and Lars Smith, Brandeis School of Law, University of Louisville

“Of Authors/Users, Rights/Privileges and the Concept of ‘Transformativeness’” Is User Generated Content an Infringing Derivative Work, or Fair Use?”, Mary Wong, Franklin Pearce Law Center
Discussants: Estelle Derclaye, University of Nottingham, and Lisa Ramsey, University of San Diego

“Working Toward Spontaneous Copyright Licensing: A Simple Solution for a Complex Problem,” Tanya Woods, University of Ottawa
Discussants: Jerry Reichmann, Duke Law School, and Lars Smith, Brandeis School of Law, University of Louisville

12:45-2 p.m. Closing and Lunch