Currently viewing the tag: "ACLU"

Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

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The recent events surrounding Edward Snowden and the NSA surveillance program are bringing domestic law enforcement surveillance into the public consciousness. In particular, the implications of Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs), used by law enforcement agencies all over the country, are being reevaluated.

The recently implemented technology consists of a camera linked to a processing [...]

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Although J. Edgar Hoover may be dead, his spirit remains alive and well.

This past Monday, the New York Times broke a story about proposed legislation that would make it easier for law enforcement to conduct wiretaps on the Internet. In essence, the legislation and accompanying regulations would mandate that all communication services, [...]

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Can You Track Me Now?

On September 9, 2010 By Kate Kliebert

Most of us use our cell phones daily without ever thinking that someone may be tracking where and how often we use them. A federal court of appeals, however, ruled on Thursday that the Fourth Amendment does not require government officials to have probable cause before requesting records detailing when and where a [...]

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The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York faced a difficult question at the intersection of law and biotechnology last month: can one patent nature? On Monday, March 29, United States District Court Judge Robert W. Sweet said no, and invalidated seven patents related to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the [...]

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Recently, a coalition of technology companies and advocacy groups has announced that it will lobby Congress to strengthen online privacy laws.

The companies involved include AT&T, Microsoft, and Google, while the advocacy groups include the American Civil Liberties Union, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and the Competitive Enterprise Institute.

Calling itself the Digital [...]

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Monday Morning JetLawg

On April 4, 2010 By JETLaw

In the news . . .

Major Internet players and civil liberties groups form Digital Due Process coalition to update privacy laws.

As sign of what’s to come, U.S. Copyright Group launches attack on movie downloaders.

Former legislator and filmmaker sues HBO and Cinemax for giving false credit to soft-core porno.

[...]

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Teachers have long attempted to dissuade misbehavior by students–particularly those who are out of their teacher’s sight–by warning them that teachers have “eyes in the back of their heads.” Now, teachers and administrators at Harriton High School in the Lower Merion School District have actually acquired the ability to know what their students are doing [...]

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