Currently viewing the tag: "antitrust"

Last month Comcast, the nation’s largest cable and broadband internet provider, announced that it had made a bid to purchase Time Warner Cable (TWC), the nation’s second largest cable provider for an eye-popping $45 billion.  If the deal goes through, Comcast would account for 38% of the broadband market and [...]

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The issue of reverse payment settlements (or pay-for-delay settlements) in pharmaceutical patent infringement suits could potentially work its ways back up to the Supreme Court. The Court recently settled a deeply divided circuit split over the legality of such settlements in FTC v. Actavis, 133 S.Ct. 2223 (2013). In Actavis, the Court held that [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 3, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Surveillance:

Tech companies win the right to report government data requests (like national security letters) in greater detail. Rand Paul plans on taking his lawsuit against the NSA to the Supreme Court. [via The Hill] The NSA hires its first Privacy and Civil Liberties Officer. [via SANSSC Magazine]

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Using Antitrust to Fight PAEs

On November 19, 2013 By Shannon Han

Due to its nature as a right to exclude, a patent can have a powerful effect on the market. Though in theory the patent is meant to serve a defensive function, some have chosen to use it as a more offensive tool: obtaining questionable royalties from inadvertent infringers, or raising a competitor’s operating costs. It [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 7, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Feds v Silk Road; NSA tracks some Tor users; DoJ on NSLs; Samsung v Apple sanctions; A-Rod v MLB; ExxonMobil v Fox

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Last week video game producer Electronic Arts Sports and the Collegiate Licensing Company reached a proposed settlement with the plaintiffs in the O’Bannon case.

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 2, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

A bill passed in New Zealand effectively bans software patents by labeling them ‘not inventions.’ A newly invented process, implemented in software, would still be patentable, but the software that implements it would not itself be patentable. Will this square New Zealand’s goal with the TRIPS Agreement’s requirement that patents be available [...]

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Pharmaceutical companies, the Federal Trade Commission, and antitrust and intellectual property attorneys waited with bated breath for the Supreme Court’s monumental decision on the legality of reverse-payment settlements, announced in FTC v. Actavis. On June 17, 2013, everyone got their answer… or did they?

What happened?

In March, this blog outlined [...]

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On July 10, 2013, a federal judge found Apple guilty of conspiring with major book publishers to raise e-book prices, marking a huge win for Amazon and consumers. The judge’s opinion portrays Apple carefully executing a plot to rally book publishers into altering their contract terms with Amazon so the iPad would face a [...]

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Are the NCAA’s Days Numbered?

On July 12, 2013 By William Wojcik

While some people have declared the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) system of governing student-athletes corrupt and in dire need of reform, the chances real change would in the NCAA has seemed . . . unlikely. The rule is simple: student athletes cannot receive any compensation for their performances on the field. [...]

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