Currently viewing the tag: "antitrust"

China’s anti-trust investigation of the American chip maker Qualcomm came to an end when the chip giant agreed to pay a record fine of about $975 million last Monday. According to the decision issued by China’s National Development and Reform Commission, the royalties Qualcomm collected from Chinese smartphone manufactures were “unfair” and “excessively [...]

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Last year, when Comcast announced its plan to purchase Time Warner Cable, the deal came under heavy scrutiny from consumer advocates. Senator Al Franken of Minnesota, one of the Senate’s most liberal members, called the proposed deal “a disaster.” In a letter to the Department of Justice, the Federal Trade Commission, and the [...]

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San Jose Strikes Out Again in Suit Against MLB

On January 22, 2015 By Andrea Scheder

The city of San Jose lost its appeal in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday. They were challenging Major League Baseball’s (MLB) long-held exception to federal antitrust laws. The Oakland Athletics are looking to make a location move and had their sights set on San Jose. However, the MLB’s constitution requires clubs [...]

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Trouble for Qualcomm in China and the U.S.

On October 1, 2014 By Peiyuan Guo

Qualcomm, a leading wireless communications chip supplier worldwide, has emerged a winner with Apple’s iPhone 6 models. A tear-down analysis by iFixit revealed five Qualcomm chips in the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. However, the good news may be offset by Qualcomm’s lingering antitrust probe in its Chinese LTE smartphone market. Last [...]

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Earlier this year, Facebook agreed to purchase the startup messaging company WhatsApp for $19 billion. WhatsApp has become hugely popular in the last few years due to its instant messaging capability, but without the usual carrier fees associated with text messaging, its compatibility with all major mobile operating systems, and its [...]

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The number of Apple’s settlement with 33 states over electronic book price fixing could reach as high as $400 million. Last month, the company agreed to settle the class action brought by 33 attorneys generals seeking hundreds of millions of dollars in damages for allegedly colluding with book publishers to inflate [...]

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Last month Comcast, the nation’s largest cable and broadband internet provider, announced that it had made a bid to purchase Time Warner Cable (TWC), the nation’s second largest cable provider for an eye-popping $45 billion.  If the deal goes through, Comcast would account for 38% of the broadband market and [...]

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The issue of reverse payment settlements (or pay-for-delay settlements) in pharmaceutical patent infringement suits could potentially work its ways back up to the Supreme Court. The Court recently settled a deeply divided circuit split over the legality of such settlements in FTC v. Actavis, 133 S.Ct. 2223 (2013). In Actavis, the Court held that [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 3, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

 

Surveillance:

Tech companies win the right to report government data requests (like national security letters) in greater detail. Rand Paul plans on taking his lawsuit against the NSA to the Supreme Court. [via The Hill] The NSA hires its first Privacy and Civil Liberties Officer. [via SANSSC Magazine]

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Using Antitrust to Fight PAEs

On November 19, 2013 By Shannon Han

Due to its nature as a right to exclude, a patent can have a powerful effect on the market. Though in theory the patent is meant to serve a defensive function, some have chosen to use it as a more offensive tool: obtaining questionable royalties from inadvertent infringers, or raising a competitor’s operating costs. It [...]

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