Currently viewing the tag: "apps"

Privacy Concerns Plague Education Apps

On April 10, 2015 By Kelsey Zottnick

The app world appears poised to disrupt the education industry.  Countless start-ups, fueled by billions in venture capital, are scrambling to capture schools’ attention. At first glance, these companies offer innovative ways to engage students in the learning process. For instance, adaptive learning apps for subjects like math calibrate lessons to individual learning patterns. Other [...]

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When Convenience Isn’t Worth It

On March 27, 2015 By Zachary Altman

Technological innovation over the last decade can be summed up in one word: convenience. In a world where over half of American adults own smartphones it makes sense that companies have begun targeting these devices with their new innovations. Innovation, in today’s world, takes the form of solving problems by increasing efficiency through greater [...]

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911: Just a Text Away?

On August 28, 2014 By Danielle Drago

Emergency help may now be at your fingertips. The Federal Communication Commission (FCC) recently voted 3-2 to adopt a rule requiring all U.S. cell phone carriers and certain app developers to implement services allowing users to send text messages to 911 by the end of 2014. [...]

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Mobile-based ride-sharing service Uber created quite a stir this weekend, setting a new valuation record for a technology startup in a direct investment round. Injecting $1.2 billion into the San Francisco-based service, investors valued Uber at $17 billion, a dramatic increase from last year’s valuation of $3.5 billion. An [...]

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The Federal Trade Commission is trying to stick its finger in the dike to keep the North Sea of privacy concerns back.  The FTC recently issued a staff report “Mobile Apps for Kids: Current Privacy Disclosures are Disappointing” (.pdf) demonstrating that, besides having a sense of humor, the FTC thinks mobile [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On November 28, 2011 By JETLaw

In the news…

N.B.A. reaches deal to save the season, which will open on Christmas Day.

Federal government seizes over 100 domain names in one of largest piracy crackdowns ever.

Militant Saudi Arabian-based group allegedly hired hackers to breach AT&T’s telecom network.

Apple removes ‘Jew [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 21, 2011 By JETLaw

In the news. . .

J.R.R. Tolkien estate threatens lawsuit over upcoming book featuring Tolkien as a character.

Literary “scout” sues over right to be paid for discovering “Twilight.”

Boarders bankruptcy petition lists creditors that include Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group.

Congress wants to shut down “rogue” [...]

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Is “Facebook Privacy” an Oxymoron?

On October 29, 2010 By Kathryn Brown

Yet again, the spotlight is on Facebook. While the famed social networking site has garnered attention in the past for pushing the privacy envelope, this time, Facebook is on the defensive after revelation that some of its third-party software applications, or “apps,” leaked personally identifiable information about [...]

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Bad Apple

On August 18, 2010 By Chris Lantz

Has Apple bitten off more than it can chew? Apple, known for being overprotective of its products, may have taken its application xenophobia too far, as evidenced by a few recent modifications to its App Store developer agreement.

A little background may be necessary: Apple iPhones (without being jail broken — recently found [...]

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iPhone “Jailbreaking” is Fair Use

On August 2, 2010 By Theresa Weisenberger

Every three years, the U.S. Copyright Office reviews the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), and issues opinions on how it should be interpreted. The most talked about exception the Office recently released is its ruling on the legality of “jailbreaking” an iPhone. Much to Apple’s dismay, jailbreaking an iPhone is fair use, which [...]

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