Currently viewing the tag: "art"

JETLaw Keeps Climbing in W&L Journal Rankings

On February 20, 2014 By JETLaw

JETLaw moves up 33 spots!

In the annual law journal rankings compiled by Washington & Lee University School of Law, JETLaw has risen another thirty-three spots — to No. 167, our highest rank ever!

We thank our exceptional authors for contributing high-quality scholarship and congratulate them for the warm [...]

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Zimmerman on Art

On January 29, 2014 By Veronica Gordon

George Zimmerman has embarked on a new venture. Since being acquitted of second-degree murder in the much-publicized Trayvon Martin case last year, he has taken to painting.

His first painting, of a waving blue American flag with “God, One Nation, With Liberty And Justice For All” stamped across it, sold on eBay last month [...]

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There was a lot going on this week, so the Monday Morning JETLawg has been broken down into topics. Monday is cybercrime and cybersecurity; Tuesday is copyright, intellectual property (IP) policy generally, government technology, and government IP; Wednesday is surveillance and censorship; Thursday is sports, entertainment, and the arts; and Friday is e-currency, e-discovery, [...]

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Mural Support

On September 18, 2013 By Avery VanPelt

If I said I was going to visit the “Mural Capital of the World,” would you know where I was going? And if I then told you that this same city had banned the painting of outdoor murals for the last 11 years, would you think I intended the title sarcastically?

I don’t, but [...]

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Kickstart My Art

On September 17, 2013 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

This summer, Martha Ingram saved Nashville’s Schermerhorn Symphony Center from a looming bankruptcy. Now, the symphony that calls the Schermerhorn home is seeking out a new patron to “be a part of the experience” of recording three works by composer Joan Tower. You are that patron. The Symphony is one of [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 16, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Was that bribery? There’s an app for that! Latham & Watkins releases an app detailing anti-corruption and bribery statutes across many countries. [H/T Law Technology News] False advertising claims (some of them, anyway) against Frito-Lay, based on an “All-Natural” label applied to GMO products, survive. [H/T @rtushnet] After [...]

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Van Gogh for Cheap

On September 4, 2013 By Emma Stephens

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and Fujifilm recently partnered to create three-dimensional reproductions of some of Van Gogh’s most well-known works, including Almond Blossom (1890), Sunflowers (1889), The Harvest (1888), Wheatfield Under Thunderclouds (1890), and Boulevard de Clichy (1887). The Van Gogh Museum and Fujifilm have an exclusive three-year [...]

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Uncertain Future for Conceptual Art

On April 14, 2011 By Kat Kubis

In February 2011, the Seventh Circuit decided in Kelley v. Chicago Park District that Wildflower Works, a large-scale outdoor wildflower display is not copyrightable, and consequently, lacks any moral rights under the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA).

A nationally recognized artist, Chapman Kelley, created Wildflower Works in 1984, and it existed in Grant Park in [...]

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Justin Timberlake may be many things to many people, but despite his proclamations at February’s Academy Awards ceremony, he is not the elusive street artist known simply as Banksy. And yet, who is Banksy? For that matter, who is Thierry Guetta? Are these people one and the same as some have [...]

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