Currently viewing the tag: "Congress"

With new technology come new products, new opportunities, and—unfortunately—new problems.  Few technologies pose quite the excitement, and potential for legal complication, as 3D printing.  3D printing, a technique that manufactures goods using thin layers of plastic based on written computer programs, has the potential to revolutionizeevery major industry in the world.  However, as Yoshitomo Imura [...]

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Bitcoin Education Day on Capitol Hill

On September 5, 2014 By Brenan Salgado

The newly-enacted Chamber of Digital Commerce (CDC), a bitcoin lobbying group, brought more than thirty professionals from the bitcoin industry to Capitol Hill on August 29 in an effort to spread awareness about the digital currency.

The CDC’s goal is to provide information to lawmakers and the general public about the bitcoin technology in [...]

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If you are anything like me, bargains are always a welcome sight.  One of the most popular venues for bargain shoppers nationwide are the slew of outlet malls that have popped up in suburban areas and near popular vacation locales.  Outlet stores advertise extensively that they offer upwards of 75 percent off [...]

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This past month, the House Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet held yet another hearing to discuss copyright reform. Aptly titled “The Scope of Copyright Protection,” it offered testimony from some of the most renowned scholars in the field. Yet, although the House and Senate conduct hearings and discuss intellectual property policy [...]

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In less than two weeks, the Supreme Court will hear the first patent case of this session, which raises the question of when to award attorney’s fees in patent cases under 35 U.S.C. § 285. The statute provides for the award of attorney fees only in “exceptional cases.” Under the rule established in Brooks [...]

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Debit, Credit, or Bitcoin?

On February 6, 2014 By Lizzie Maratea

Will that be debit, credit, or bitcoin? Could bitcoin become that ubiquitous? Those wily Winklevoss twins and the rest of the Bitcoin community have been working to remove the stigma of illegitimacy from the virtual currency, but they want to do so without any additional “draconian” regulation that might interfere with its [...]

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Net Neutrality Rules Hit Another Wall

On January 24, 2014 By Parker Hancock

For several years, net neutrality has been a major issue among consumer groups, startup companies, and many others who value the open nature of the internet. In the early days of the internet, internet service providers (ISPs) relayed data between websites and users indiscriminately, operating as a mere conduit. In the last few years, however, [...]

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The Copyright Office Tunes In

On November 4, 2010 By Kelly Donley

Upon Congress’s prompting, the U.S. Copyright Office has begun a study on the desirability of bringing sound recordings fixed before February 15, 1972, under federal jurisdiction. In a notice of inquiry, the Copyright Office has requested written comments from all interested parties.

Sound recordings were protected solely under state law [...]

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Breaking Down The Stem Cell Ruling

On August 26, 2010 By Kevin Lumpkin

You’ve probably heard by now that a federal court issued a temporary injunction earlier this week, precluding the federal government from funding any research project involving embryonic stem cells. This post attempts to break down the legal basis for the ruling, and what it means for the Obama administration’s plans for stem cell [...]

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While the trade and purchase of “conflict” diamonds has been well-publicized, other minerals are routinely mined and traded in war-torn countries such as Congo. Surprisingly, or at least not as well publicized, many of these minerals play an integral role in the development of cell phones.

Four minerals commonly used in cellphones [...]

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