Currently viewing the tag: "U.S. Constitution"

Location Data, Privacy, and California

On August 28, 2012 By Brandon Trout

The efforts of the courts and their officials to bring the guilty to punishment, praiseworthy as they are, are not to be aided by the sacrifice of those great principles established by years of endeavor and suffering which have resulted in their embodiment in the fundamental law of the land. – Justice Day, Weeks v. [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 20, 2012 By JETLaw

Following its acquisition by Google, Motorola files patent suit against Apple. More updates on Apple/Samsung case. The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reaffirms ruling that isolated human genes can be patented. Sixth Circuit rules that there is no expectation of privacy in [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 13, 2012 By JETLaw

Google will start downranking sites that receive repeated DMCA takedown notices, in an effort to crack down on piracy websites in its search results. Facebook and the FTC reach a settlement over privacy issues, with Facebook receiving no fine. Facebook ‘likes’ this. The Apple/Samsung battle wages on. [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 6, 2012 By JETLaw

Justice Ginsburg’s thoughts on how the Constitution and Opera are related. MGM settles lawsuit over ‘Raging Bull’ sequel. Illinois becomes the third state to pass a social media privacy law, prohibiting employers from demanding employees’ passwords. Honeywell strikes licensing deal with Microsoft in order to [...]

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Freedom to File Share

On July 27, 2012 By Amelia McKeithen

Freedom of religion is not a new concept.  However, in Sweden, the concept is being put to a very new test.  The website for a new religion called kopimism, recently recognized by the Swedish government, references the Swedish Constitution in stating that “every citizen is against the government guaranteed freedom of religion: [...]

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I want to start this post by expressing my deepest sympathies to the victims of the shooting in Aurora, Colorado.  Also, I would like to point out that the opinions in this post are meant to spark meaningful debate, and in no way represent the views of the Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology [...]

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Liar Liar, Pants (no longer!) on Fire

On June 28, 2012 By Brandon Trout

Many people that use the internet lie. *gasp* This may come as a shock to a few, but it is the sad truth of the online world. Further complicating matters, there is little that anyone can do to stop it. Rhode Island, who once had a law that imposed a fine for spreading [...]

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Remember that embarrassing picture you posted on Facebook after a night out with your friends? The one that you forgot about, rediscovered seven years later, broke out in a cry of terror, and immediately deleted that part (or parts) of yourself from your page? Seeing the picture vanish, you sat back in your chair, and [...]

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The End of Web Anonymity?

On May 23, 2012 By Caitlin Angelette

People have announcing the End of Web Anonymity for years, and perhaps with synergy of our Google accounts, we have a harder time remaining anonymous.  But what would it take to truly end anonymity?  How about a proposed New York law that would require web administrators to remove anonymous posts?  [...]

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Concerns about cyberbullying have reached an all-time high recently, gaining traction from the decision in the highly publicized Tyler Clementi case.  While non-profit organizations like stopcyberbullying.org list prevention techniques like educating children and raising awareness, some state governments may opt to take a more aggressive step that could end up [...]

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