Currently viewing the tag: "copyright infringement"

The Ninth Circuit Does Not Feel the Burn

On March 17, 2016 By Katherine Dutcher

Bikram Choudhury’s famous sequence of twenty-six yoga poses and two breathing exercises—which is performed over ninety minutes in a humid, 105-degree room—is not copyrightable, says the Ninth Circuit. Choudhury, the self-proclaimed “Yogi to the stars,” popularized this form of “hot yoga” after emigrating to Beverly Hills in the early 1970s, and he detailed the [...]

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“Happy Birthday to You” = $14 million settlement

On February 15, 2016 By Erin Webb

The English language’s most popular song “Happy Birthday to You” just entered the public domain. Warner Music has paid $14 million to settle a lawsuit challenging its copyright over the popular song. While Warner argues that its 1935 copyright registration should be entitled to a presumption of validity, and has charged for the use [...]

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Last week, four executives of Shenzhen QVOD Technology Inc., a Chinese online peer-to-peer video-hosting platform, stood trial in Beijing. It was alleged that the company allowed pornographic websites to access its streaming technology and approximately 21,000 pornographic materials have been distributed on three servers run by QVOD. The four executives, who pleaded not guilty, [...]

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Protecting Street Art: Wynwood Art District as a Case Study

On November 30, 2015 By ppatino

It’s the most wonderful time of the year – Art Basel in Miami Beach. This trendy affair combines some of the world’s premier art with insanely exclusive parties, incredible music events, and even national politics. While the extravagance of Art Basel momentarily dazzles the entire city, Miamians get to hangout [...]

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This is the digital age of music. From hip-hop and R&B to techno and dancehall genres, artists more frequently create music using programs rather than people. Even artists who create music using traditional acoustic instruments frequently convert their sound to electronically marketable media. The result is an immense collection of intellectual property. Accordingly, artists would [...]

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“I was high and drunk.” Not always the best thing to admit in a deposition, but in the recently released deposition videos from the “Blurred Lines” trial, Robin Thicke did just that.  With the case heading towards appeal, the video footage was released Monday of both Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ depositions.  While transcripts [...]

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Google Book Scanning Upheld by U.S Appeals Court

On October 28, 2015 By jlukasiewicz

On Oct. 16th, the Second United States Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled that Google’s Books scanning effort to create an online library does not violate copyright law and is protected by fair use. The decision, which rejects the latest challenge in Authors Guild v. Google, also held that Google’s provision of [...]

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As 2015 comes to an end, so too will the 2013 Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement. Implemented in June of 2013 by the White House’s Office of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), this three-year plan advanced the nation’s intellectual property enforcement and policy priorities. Aiming to better protect intellectual property rights domestically [...]

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Beijing won its bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics last week, but since then, “The Snow and Ice Dance,” one of the 9 official songs Bejing used for its campaign, has been questioned for plagiarism. Some Internet users and media believed that the song is substantially similar to “Let It Go” [...]

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Be careful what you selfie. A controversial artist recently challenged the bounds of Instagram’s photo-sharing service. Richard Prnice, an “appropriation artist,” sparked controversy by showcasing other Instagrammers’ screenshots in an art exhibit.  The exhibit features replicas of unwitting Instagram users’ photos, unaltered save a single added comment tacked at the end of each one. [...]

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