Currently viewing the tag: "copyright infringement"

As 2015 comes to an end, so too will the 2013 Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement. Implemented in June of 2013 by the White House’s Office of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), this three-year plan advanced the nation’s intellectual property enforcement and policy priorities. Aiming to better protect intellectual property rights domestically [...]

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Beijing won its bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics last week, but since then, “The Snow and Ice Dance,” one of the 9 official songs Bejing used for its campaign, has been questioned for plagiarism. Some Internet users and media believed that the song is substantially similar to “Let It Go” [...]

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Be careful what you selfie. A controversial artist recently challenged the bounds of Instagram’s photo-sharing service. Richard Prnice, an “appropriation artist,” sparked controversy by showcasing other Instagrammers’ screenshots in an art exhibit.  The exhibit features replicas of unwitting Instagram users’ photos, unaltered save a single added comment tacked at the end of each one. [...]

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The heirs of Morton Stevens, the composer for the original Hawaii Five-0’s iconic, Emmy-winning theme song, are suing CBS for copyright infringement. The network used the song in a reboot of the series, which premiered in 2010 and continues to air today.

Stevens’ heirs allege that CBS wrongfully filed a renewal registration after the composer [...]

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Who Rightfully Owns the Village People’s YMCA?

On February 23, 2015 By Victoria Roessler

The Village People are back in the spotlight, but not in costume this time. A trial has recently begun to determine the rightful songwriter behind twenty-four of the Village People’s biggest hits, including “YMCA” and “Macho Man.” In May 2012, Victor Willis, the original Village People singer-songwriter (or for those of your familiar with [...]

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Copyright law and popular music can sometimes appear to be strange bedfellows. The Founders were not likely to have intended this tension, given the fact that “promot[ing] the . . . useful Arts,” is followed by a phrase that limits the exclusive right to use, only “securing [it] for limited Times to Authors and Inventors.” [...]

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After a startling revelation on the first day, the trial of Ross Ulbricht, the alleged Dread Pirate Roberts continues this week. On day one of the trial, Ulbricht’s defense attorney conceded that yes, Ross Ulbricht did indeed start the notorious Silk Road market.

Silk Road was intended to be, as portrayed by Ulbricht’s defense counsel, [...]

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Faux Hershey Settles

On October 23, 2014 By Chastity Bobo

Hershey Company has settled the trademark infringement lawsuit it filed in June against TinctureBelle, LLC and TinctureBelle Marijuanka LLC, Colorado based marijuana-candy companies. Hershey claimed consumers would be confused by the similarities between marijuana-infused chocolate products and popular Hershey favorites. Other included claims were: trademark dilution, false designation of origin, unfair competition, and passing off.

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Disney Sued Over Frozen

On October 21, 2014 By Danielle Dudding

Isabella Tanikumi has filed a lawsuit against the Walt Disney Company claiming Disney’s Frozen is not an original work, but instead the storyline and characters were stolen from her memoirs.

For the few people in the world who have yet to be exposed to Frozen, it features the story of two princesses, Elsa and [...]

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They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Unfortunately, imitation—or rather artistic inspiration—has landed R&B singer Robin Thicke and super-producer Pharrell Williams in quite the legal brouhaha.

Since August 2013, there’s been an ongoing legal battle over the similarities between Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” and Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up.” Over a [...]

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