Currently viewing the tag: "copyright"

FCC No Longer to Blackout Sporting Events

On October 27, 2014 By Michael Griffin

For years, professional sports and blackouts have gone hand-in-hand. No, not those blackouts; broadcast blackouts of games that failed to sell out. But the times, they are a changin’.

In November of last year, the JETLaw Blog reported that the FCC was reviewing its policy on blackouts. Most sports blackouts are [...]

Continue Reading

Disney Sued Over Frozen

On October 21, 2014 By Danielle Dudding

Isabella Tanikumi has filed a lawsuit against the Walt Disney Company claiming Disney’s Frozen is not an original work, but instead the storyline and characters were stolen from her memoirs.

For the few people in the world who have yet to be exposed to Frozen, it features the story of two princesses, Elsa and [...]

Continue Reading

The Supreme Court could have another opportunity to review an IP case decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Last week Google filed a petition for certiorari seeking to overturn the Federal Circuit’s decision in Oracle America v. Google, which found [...]

Continue Reading

A new copyright law came into effect in the United Kingdom on October 1st, modifying copyright protection of parodies. The Copyright and Rights in Performances (Quotation and Parody) Regulations allow the use of copyrighted material for parody purposes if [...]

Continue Reading

Marvel—Kirby Dispute Ends “Amicably”

On October 10, 2014 By Sarah Robbins

An epic legal battle between the famous comic creator Jack Kirby and Marvel Comic was settled just days before the Supreme Court was scheduled to discuss the case. The parties were involved in an extensive legal dispute regarding the ownership rights to legendary comic characters such as X-men, Iron Man, and Spider-Man. The [...]

Continue Reading

A Hollywood lawyer representing Jennifer Lawrence, Kristen Dunst, and Kate Upton accused Google of taking “little or no action” to remove the recent hacked nude photos and even facilitating their dispersal, in a letter sent Wednesday threatening a $100 million lawsuit.

Entertainment lawyer Martin Singer–known in the industry as Continue Reading

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Unfortunately, imitation—or rather artistic inspiration—has landed R&B singer Robin Thicke and super-producer Pharrell Williams in quite the legal brouhaha.

Since August 2013, there’s been an ongoing legal battle over the similarities between Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” and Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up.” Over a [...]

Continue Reading

Late last month, a Wolverhampton judge in the United Kingdom sentenced a man to 33 months in jail for distributing a pirated copy of Fast and Furious 6. Phillip Danks covertly recorded the movie from his seat in the back of the theater, and then posted his recording online under [...]

Continue Reading

Copyright Office Decides Monkeys Can’t Be Authors

On September 11, 2014 By Thomas Hayden

Last week, the Copyright Office issued new guidance to clarify that it will only register copyrights for creative work produced by humans. Animals and computers (without human intervention) don’t possess “creative powers of the mind” in the same way that humans do. You’re likewise out of luck if you’re a “divine [...]

Continue Reading

Sometimes, art imitating life yields some strange results. In 1981, (animated) newspaperman J. Jonah Jameson ran the headline, “threat or menace” when discussing the masked Spider-Man in New York City’s (fictitious) Daily Bugle. Today, such a headline would not seem out of place on recent covers of the New York Post.

Between “Spidey’s” [...]

Continue Reading