Currently viewing the tag: "copyright"

The Wu-Tang Clan’s latest—and perhaps last—collective musical endeavor has been six years in the making, will be sold exclusively to one (very wealthy) buyer, and will only be released commercially after 88 years. Anyone reading this now will likely never see that day. Why such extremes? “Art is extreme,” group leader RZA says. “For [...]

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Last month, Harper Collins announced that they would publish Harper Lee’s novel, Go Set a Watchman. Lee’s debut novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, brought the noble local attorney Atticus Finch into the public imagination.

The coverage of Go Tell a Watchman has focused on Tonja Carter, Lee’s nonfictional attorney. Carter, a 2006 graduate [...]

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The heirs of Morton Stevens, the composer for the original Hawaii Five-0’s iconic, Emmy-winning theme song, are suing CBS for copyright infringement. The network used the song in a reboot of the series, which premiered in 2010 and continues to air today.

Stevens’ heirs allege that CBS wrongfully filed a renewal registration after the composer [...]

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Feeling nostalgic is not new for the average 90′s kid. Buzzfeed and other sites frequently put out lists and reminders of what children experienced in the 90′s and 00′s. One site brought actual television shows from Nickelodeon to your computer streaming. Nickreboot did more just remind the visiter that they used [...]

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Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Is Streaming Speech?

On March 3, 2015 By Chastity Bobo

Pandora had long thought it could use pre-1972 recordings free of charge, but the rock band The Turtles are trying to prove them wrong. Last week, Judge Philip S. Gutierrez denied Pandora’s motion to dismiss.  This is not the first time the signers from the Turtles, suing as Flo & Eddie, Inc., have been successful against [...]

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Once every three years, the United States Copyright Office allows for the submission of proposed exemptions to Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Section 1201 prohibits individuals from circumventing a technological measure that controls access to a protected work even if the reason for doing so is otherwise legal. The exemptions [...]

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Who Rightfully Owns the Village People’s YMCA?

On February 23, 2015 By Victoria Roessler

The Village People are back in the spotlight, but not in costume this time. A trial has recently begun to determine the rightful songwriter behind twenty-four of the Village People’s biggest hits, including “YMCA” and “Macho Man.” In May 2012, Victor Willis, the original Village People singer-songwriter (or for those of your familiar with [...]

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Copyright law and popular music can sometimes appear to be strange bedfellows. The Founders were not likely to have intended this tension, given the fact that “promot[ing] the . . . useful Arts,” is followed by a phrase that limits the exclusive right to use, only “securing [it] for limited Times to Authors and Inventors.” [...]

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After a startling revelation on the first day, the trial of Ross Ulbricht, the alleged Dread Pirate Roberts continues this week. On day one of the trial, Ulbricht’s defense attorney conceded that yes, Ross Ulbricht did indeed start the notorious Silk Road market.

Silk Road was intended to be, as portrayed by Ulbricht’s defense counsel, [...]

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