Currently viewing the tag: "copyright"

Feeling nostalgic is not new for the average 90′s kid. Buzzfeed and other sites frequently put out lists and reminders of what children experienced in the 90′s and 00′s. One site brought actual television shows from Nickelodeon to your computer streaming. Nickreboot did more just remind the visiter that they used [...]

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Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Is Streaming Speech?

On March 3, 2015 By Chastity Bobo

Pandora had long thought it could use pre-1972 recordings free of charge, but the rock band The Turtles are trying to prove them wrong. Last week, Judge Philip S. Gutierrez denied Pandora’s motion to dismiss.  This is not the first time the signers from the Turtles, suing as Flo & Eddie, Inc., have been successful against [...]

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Once every three years, the United States Copyright Office allows for the submission of proposed exemptions to Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Section 1201 prohibits individuals from circumventing a technological measure that controls access to a protected work even if the reason for doing so is otherwise legal. The exemptions [...]

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Who Rightfully Owns the Village People’s YMCA?

On February 23, 2015 By Victoria Roessler

The Village People are back in the spotlight, but not in costume this time. A trial has recently begun to determine the rightful songwriter behind twenty-four of the Village People’s biggest hits, including “YMCA” and “Macho Man.” In May 2012, Victor Willis, the original Village People singer-songwriter (or for those of your familiar with [...]

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Copyright law and popular music can sometimes appear to be strange bedfellows. The Founders were not likely to have intended this tension, given the fact that “promot[ing] the . . . useful Arts,” is followed by a phrase that limits the exclusive right to use, only “securing [it] for limited Times to Authors and Inventors.” [...]

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After a startling revelation on the first day, the trial of Ross Ulbricht, the alleged Dread Pirate Roberts continues this week. On day one of the trial, Ulbricht’s defense attorney conceded that yes, Ross Ulbricht did indeed start the notorious Silk Road market.

Silk Road was intended to be, as portrayed by Ulbricht’s defense counsel, [...]

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A Scandal in the Public Domain

On November 11, 2014 By Doruk Onvural

Case closed, or so it appears, as the Supreme Court refused to grant cert to the Seventh Circuit’s holding that classic characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are in the public domain.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle published his first Sherlock Holmes story in 1886. Fans loved the character so much, the author couldn’t even [...]

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FCC No Longer to Blackout Sporting Events

On October 27, 2014 By Michael Griffin

For years, professional sports and blackouts have gone hand-in-hand. No, not those blackouts; broadcast blackouts of games that failed to sell out. But the times, they are a changin’.

In November of last year, the JETLaw Blog reported that the FCC was reviewing its policy on blackouts. Most sports blackouts are [...]

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Disney Sued Over Frozen

On October 21, 2014 By Danielle Dudding

Isabella Tanikumi has filed a lawsuit against the Walt Disney Company claiming Disney’s Frozen is not an original work, but instead the storyline and characters were stolen from her memoirs.

For the few people in the world who have yet to be exposed to Frozen, it features the story of two princesses, Elsa and [...]

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