Currently viewing the tag: "courts"

The Miss America Rule

On July 15, 2014 By Erin Shackelford

Controversy over the unceremonious departure of the former Miss Delaware may lead to litigation.  Former Miss Delaware Amanda Longacre was stripped of her crown after winning the title in June.  Brittany Lewis, the original runner-up for the Miss Delaware pageant, was crowned the new Miss Delaware shortly after Longacre’s removal.

Longacre was [...]

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On June 23th, the Supreme Court handed down one of the most highly anticipated securities litigation opinions in recent memory. Halliburton II brought the fraud-on-the-market theory, the linchpin of securities class actions, squarely in front of the Court. For months, excerpts from various other Court opinions suggested the theory was ripe [...]

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In a case of first impression, the Tennessee Middle District Court recently confronted the issue of racial discrimination in reality television.  Plaintiffs Nathaniel Claybrooks and Christopher Johnson—two African American men who were denied the opportunity to be cast as The Bachelor in ABC’s reality-based dating show of the same name—filed [...]

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The A’s Raw Sewage Anti-Trust Problem

On February 26, 2014 By Ryan Loofbourrow

In 1922, the Supreme Court, in Federal Baseball Club of Baltimore, Inc., v. National Baseball Clubs, ruled that Major League Baseball is exempt from Anti-Trust laws.  This means that the MLB must allow a team to move if it wants to move.  It got this exemption because, apparently, baseball was [...]

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Exceeding Authorized Access

On February 7, 2014 By Jonathan Hoffmann

Last week the US District Court for the Northern District of California dismissed a case under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. § 1030, thereby contributing to an ever-growing debate [PDF] about the meaning of the words “exceeding authorized access.”

Despite the fact that the CFAA Continue Reading

Aereo Heads to the Supreme Court

On January 16, 2014 By Brenan Salgado

On Friday, January 10, the Supreme Court granted cert to the major broadcasters’ challenge to Aereo. This follows on the heels of a recent ruling questioning the legality of Aereo’s (and, increasingly, other TV-over-internet service providers’) business models.

Aereo’s TV-over-internet technology captures over-the-air digital television broadcasts and relays them as [...]

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Google Books is Fair Use

On November 18, 2013 By Erin Shackelford

 

This week, Google dodged a multi-billion dollar bullet. After a nine-year legal battle, Google secured a victory against the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers. The author’s advocates filed a copyright infringement suit against Google in 2004 after it announced its “Google [...]

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A Minnesota designer of satirical t-shirts has filed suit [PDF] against the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security for their attempts to take down his merchandise. Federal agencies have a reputation for being aggressive in Continue Reading

Almost Half of Supreme Court Links Don’t Work

On October 23, 2013 By Michael Griffin

It should come as no surprise that Supreme Court Justices are not the most tech-savvy bunch. After all, they still haven’t “really gotten into email.” But maybe that’s for the best. In at least one instance, the Court’s foray into new technology has been shaky.

According to a new study [...]

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Wednesday Morning JETLawg

On October 16, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

 

Once again we had many news items this week, so we are posting a second round-up. We found a number of legal technology projects attempting to change the way laws are made, interpreted, and complied with far into the future.

Legal Technology:

How will lawmaking, legal education, and legal practice look in fifty [...]

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