Currently viewing the tag: "courts"

Silicon Valley Strikes Back

On September 3, 2013 By Richard Saunders

As more information regarding the NSA’s surveillance program, dubbed X-Keyscore, trickles into the public domain, technology industry titans continue their battle with the government for increased transparency of national security requests.

Until recently, the full extent of domestic surveillance was largely unknown due to a closely guarded, secret surveillance request process. All surveillance requests [...]

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Proxy servers, like other technologies that facilitate anonymity, serve both good and bad interests. On the one hand, they have helped people living under oppressive regimes view otherwise-censored content. On the other hand, they are used to facilitate criminal activity, including terrorist attacks. The function of a proxy server is not complicated: you [...]

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This week, Eastman Chemical is taking a chance on a lawsuit in an attempt to redeem the safety reputation of its plastic products. In response to strong consumer demand for safer water bottles and baby products, Eastman created one of the first BPA-free plastics, called Tritan. Recent studies by a small Texas company, Certichem, [...]

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A “black swan event” is one that comes as a surprise and has a significant effect.  An “intern” is often defined as a student or graduate undergoing some type of supervised training or work.  What is not included in the dictionary definition, however, is that they are–more often than not–unpaid. [...]

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DNA’s Month in Court

On June 21, 2013 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

June has been an interesting month for DNA at the Supreme Court and for technology and the law generally.  Justice Scalia demonstrated his own signature brand of judicial restraint by declining to sign on to those aspects of last Thursday’s Myriad Genetics decision that explained “fine details of molecular biology.”  [...]

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No Country for Old Mp3s

On April 10, 2013 By Veronica Gordon

You can resell your old CDs, tapes, and records. That’s a no-brainer for music lovers who have sifted through piles of records to find old-school gems. But, according to a federal court in New York’s Southern District, the same right does not apply to the resale of digital files. So much for keeping that tradition [...]

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Robots: Jurors of the Future?

On March 12, 2013 By Mary Fletcher King

Will we one day no longer be judged by a jury of peers but by a jury of robots? Scientists are currently teaching robots to identify false testimony. The authors of the study, Tommaso Fornaciari and Massimo Poesio, explain that “effective methods for evaluating the reliability of statements issued by witnesses [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On March 4, 2013 By Brandon Trout

FCC Chairman voices ‘concerns‘ about US phone unlocking ban, says he’ll look into it. Apple patent application reveals a camera with built-in privacy filter. Judge upholds FaceTime patent verdict against Apple, orders royalties to boot. Cablevision files antitrust suit against Viacom over programming [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 25, 2013 By Brandon Trout

Yet Another Court Says IP Addresses Are Not Enough To Positively Identify Infringers. Fox sues Dish again over the Hopper, this time over place-shifting, not ad-skipping. Apple patent app describes flexible, wearable, watch-like AMOLED device. White House threatens trade sanctions for countries found cyber-snooping. Google [...]

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