Currently viewing the tag: "courts"

A “black swan event” is one that comes as a surprise and has a significant effect.  An “intern” is often defined as a student or graduate undergoing some type of supervised training or work.  What is not included in the dictionary definition, however, is that they are–more often than not–unpaid. [...]

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DNA’s Month in Court

On June 21, 2013 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

June has been an interesting month for DNA at the Supreme Court and for technology and the law generally.  Justice Scalia demonstrated his own signature brand of judicial restraint by declining to sign on to those aspects of last Thursday’s Myriad Genetics decision that explained “fine details of molecular biology.”  [...]

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No Country for Old Mp3s

On April 10, 2013 By Veronica Gordon

You can resell your old CDs, tapes, and records. That’s a no-brainer for music lovers who have sifted through piles of records to find old-school gems. But, according to a federal court in New York’s Southern District, the same right does not apply to the resale of digital files. So much for keeping that tradition [...]

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Robots: Jurors of the Future?

On March 12, 2013 By Mary Fletcher King

Will we one day no longer be judged by a jury of peers but by a jury of robots? Scientists are currently teaching robots to identify false testimony. The authors of the study, Tommaso Fornaciari and Massimo Poesio, explain that “effective methods for evaluating the reliability of statements issued by witnesses [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On March 4, 2013 By Brandon Trout

FCC Chairman voices ‘concerns‘ about US phone unlocking ban, says he’ll look into it. Apple patent application reveals a camera with built-in privacy filter. Judge upholds FaceTime patent verdict against Apple, orders royalties to boot. Cablevision files antitrust suit against Viacom over programming [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 25, 2013 By Brandon Trout

Yet Another Court Says IP Addresses Are Not Enough To Positively Identify Infringers. Fox sues Dish again over the Hopper, this time over place-shifting, not ad-skipping. Apple patent app describes flexible, wearable, watch-like AMOLED device. White House threatens trade sanctions for countries found cyber-snooping. Google [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 18, 2013 By Brandon Trout

Facebook wins German case to force users to use their real names online. FAA moves ahead with plans to allow drone test flights in US airspace. Even Obama knows patent trolls are “extorting” money. Google files first patent suit against British Telecom. HP [...]

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Hate Crimes, Beards, and a Mullet

On February 13, 2013 By J.P. Urban

Although the Amish attacks were brazen, victims were initially reluctant to come forward, in part because the Amish community is insulated from mainstream society

The JETlaw Blog typically focuses on the cutting edge of technological innovation and the laws that govern it.  Today, however, we are going to take a moment to remind ourselves that technology cannot solve all [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 4, 2013 By Brandon Trout

Path settles with the FTC over contact privacy violations. US DOJ asks FCC to defer Sprint/Softbank merger. Judge Koh rules that Samsung did not willingly infringe Apple’s patents (pdf) Apple trademarks its retail store design. How Newegg crushed the “shopping cart” patent and [...]

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