Currently viewing the tag: "criminal law"

Your Emoji May Be Used Against You in a Court of Law

On November 22, 2016 By omarshall

Emojis can be potent symbols for communication.  A seemingly serious message can become playful with the addition of a “winking face” emoji; a knife or gun emoji can indicate sinister intentions.  The use of emojis skyrocketed after Apple included an emoji keyboard on its iPhone in 2011 and now play a large part in everyday [...]

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The Future of Policing

On March 24, 2016 By jlukasiewicz

The police department of Fresno, California has been using the software program, Beware, for the last year now. It has recently decided to continue the use of the program after an initial free trial period. The makers of Beware, Intrado, wanted to develop a “tool to help
first responders understand the [...]

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The Netflix original documentary, Making a Murderer, became an enormous hit and captured the viewing public’s attention. The 10-part documentary details the life of Steven Avery, a rural Wisconsin man whose three-decade battle with the justice system is at the heart of the film. Steven was originally convicted of chilling crime in 1985 that he [...]

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Last week, four executives of Shenzhen QVOD Technology Inc., a Chinese online peer-to-peer video-hosting platform, stood trial in Beijing. It was alleged that the company allowed pornographic websites to access its streaming technology and approximately 21,000 pornographic materials have been distributed on three servers run by QVOD. The four executives, who pleaded not guilty, [...]

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The Rise of ‘Swatting’

On December 4, 2015 By Megan McLean

In late August 2014, a fifteen-year-old online gamer, Paul Horner was sentenced to twenty-five years to life in prison for his role in a devastating online prank. Horner is the first person in history to be charged with what is known as ‘swatting,’ a growing trend in which a person anonymously files a false [...]

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Does Yik Yak Facilitate Communities or Threats?

On October 15, 2015 By Sara Hunter

Yik Yak, the anonymous location-based social media app, has been under scrutiny since its inception. The start-up, which was launched in November 2013, allows users to make anonymous posts, or “yaks”, and permits others to comment upon those yaks. Yik Yak seeks to build communities by using GPS location-based technology, which shows users posts from [...]

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That a person would admit to a crime he didn’t commit seems an improbable occurrence, and yet false confessions are responsible for more than a quarter of the 330 DNA exonerations secured by the Innocence Project to date. In order to reduce the prevalence of false confessions, the Innocence Project and other advocacy groups have [...]

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Dethroning the Tyrant of Numbers

On March 12, 2015 By Daniel Ward

Where are statistics and principled probabilistic thinking in law and legal education? Many law students shudder at the thought of any sort of computational mathematics or mathematical reasoning, and I have often heard my fellow students repeat the old joking excuse when anything numbers-related comes up in class: “I went to law school so I [...]

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Silk Road Recap

On March 10, 2015 By Michael Griffin

One month out, commentators are still digesting the conviction of Silk Road creator Ross Ulbricht. The case raises questions about the government’s investigations tactics, the lawyers’ trial strategies, and the broader implications for privacy, the internet, and the public.

As the JETLaw Blog previously reported, the Silk Road was intended to be a decentralized [...]

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Parking Next to Picasso

On March 5, 2015 By Robyn Taylor

Where would you find 271 previously unseen works by Pablo Picasso? In a garage, of course. Picasso’s former electrician, Pierre Le Guennec, and his wife, Danielle, are accused of handling over 271 stolen Picasso masterpieces. The works have been sitting in Le Guennec’s garage for over forty years. Le Guennec contends that Picasso’s [...]

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