Currently viewing the tag: "criminal law"

Does Yik Yak Facilitate Communities or Threats?

On October 15, 2015 By Sara Hunter

Yik Yak, the anonymous location-based social media app, has been under scrutiny since its inception. The start-up, which was launched in November 2013, allows users to make anonymous posts, or “yaks”, and permits others to comment upon those yaks. Yik Yak seeks to build communities by using GPS location-based technology, which shows users posts from [...]

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That a person would admit to a crime he didn’t commit seems an improbable occurrence, and yet false confessions are responsible for more than a quarter of the 330 DNA exonerations secured by the Innocence Project to date. In order to reduce the prevalence of false confessions, the Innocence Project and other advocacy groups have [...]

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Dethroning the Tyrant of Numbers

On March 12, 2015 By Daniel Ward

Where are statistics and principled probabilistic thinking in law and legal education? Many law students shudder at the thought of any sort of computational mathematics or mathematical reasoning, and I have often heard my fellow students repeat the old joking excuse when anything numbers-related comes up in class: “I went to law school so I [...]

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Silk Road Recap

On March 10, 2015 By Michael Griffin

One month out, commentators are still digesting the conviction of Silk Road creator Ross Ulbricht. The case raises questions about the government’s investigations tactics, the lawyers’ trial strategies, and the broader implications for privacy, the internet, and the public.

As the JETLaw Blog previously reported, the Silk Road was intended to be a decentralized [...]

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Parking Next to Picasso

On March 5, 2015 By Robyn Taylor

Where would you find 271 previously unseen works by Pablo Picasso? In a garage, of course. Picasso’s former electrician, Pierre Le Guennec, and his wife, Danielle, are accused of handling over 271 stolen Picasso masterpieces. The works have been sitting in Le Guennec’s garage for over forty years. Le Guennec contends that Picasso’s [...]

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Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

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Although the Supreme Court has held that police officers must obtain a warrant in order to search a suspect’s cell phone upon arrest, not all police departments have gotten on board. At least one California Highway Patrol officer has been accused of stealing nude photographs [...]

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EMV Cards Finally Coming to the US

On October 30, 2014 By Sara Hunter

On October 17, 2014, just days before Staples announced that it was investigating a “potential [security] issue,” President Obama signed an executive order to accelerate EMV adoption in the United States.

The hacking trend first began in November of 2013 when—a few days before Thanksgiving—Target’s security and payments system was hacked. In the first [...]

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The NFL is constantly under scrutiny. This time it is the players’ treatment of family members—rather than the league’s treatment of players—attracting unwanted attention. In the wake of separate scandals involving Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson, the NFL has had to determine the appropriate punishment for players’ actions off [...]

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This past March, a grand jury indicted Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice on third-degree aggravated assault charges after video surfaced of Rice hitting his then fiancé outside a casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Rice pleaded not guilty, avoided trial, and ultimately ended up being sentenced to complete a pre-intervention program. In terms of [...]

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