Currently viewing the tag: "cybercrime"

Since the leaks from whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed that the US government has been running an unprecedentedly enormous data gathering effort on basically all Americans, Congress has been slow to remove what many see as an unforgivable overreach of government power.  In fact, today’s Congress is barely even capable of Continue Reading

Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 17, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Surveillance & Censorship:

The Washington Post reports that documents leaked by Edward Snowden show that the NSA received intelligence from Australia’s signals intelligence division on Chicago-based law firm Mayer Brown in relation to the firm’s representation of the Indonesian government in a trade dispute. In response, Indonesia’s foreign minister Continue Reading

Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 18, 2010 By JETLaw

In the news. . .

Film companies threaten copyright infringement lawsuits against PETA over the animal rights group’s repeated unauthorized use of film clips in their advertising campaigns.

British judge refuses to dismiss plagiarism lawsuit against J.K. Rowling, stating plaintiff claiming Rowling stole ideas for “Harry Potter” from obscure fantasy book [...]

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Fantasy Crime: The Role of Criminal Law in Virtual Worlds

On December 13, 2008 By JETLaw

Beware Second Lifers! Virtual crime has become a reality and, as these incidents make headlines, legal scholars are trying to figure out how to handle these new, sometimes perplexing issues. Although virtual crime is certainly less common than real world crime, its implications, both from a philosophical and legal standpoint, are great. Should criminal [...]

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An American grand jury indicted a German and a Briton last Thursday, beginning the first American prosecution of hackers for distributed denial-of-service attacks. Axel Gembe and Lee Graham Walker are accused of intentionally damaging a computer system and conspiracy, charges that could lead to fifteen years in prison.

A distributed denial-of-service, or [...]

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