Currently viewing the tag: "DC Circuit"

Monday Morning JETLawg

On January 27, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Patent Eligibility Symposium Wrap-Up

On Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, JETLaw hosted its 2013-2014 symposium, Patents 101: From Computer Code to Genetic Codes, focusing on what, exactly, is eligible for patent protection. Chief Judge Randall Rader of the Federal Circuit delivered the keynote address, and panels addressed software patents, gene patents, and principles of patent [...]

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Net Neutrality Rules Hit Another Wall

On January 24, 2014 By Parker Hancock

For several years, net neutrality has been a major issue among consumer groups, startup companies, and many others who value the open nature of the internet. In the early days of the internet, internet service providers (ISPs) relayed data between websites and users indiscriminately, operating as a mere conduit. In the last few years, however, [...]

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“Hail to the Redskins! Hail Victory! Braves on the warpath! Fight for old D.C.!” Many fans of the NFL’s Washington Redskins know the team’s fight song by heart, though it has undergone changes since its debut in 1938 as a result of controversial, and arguably offensive, lyrics. The team’s name has also long been mired [...]

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The Future of TV-over-Internet Services

On September 13, 2013 By Brenan Salgado

As people look for more and more ways to control their consumption of broadcast television, new avenues open up for companies that do not create their own content. One such avenue, TV-over-internet, capitalizes on free, over-the-air television by capturing and relaying it to users over the internet. This provides users with more control over how [...]

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Verizon Seeks to Close Down FCC’s Open Internet

On September 11, 2013 By Lizzie Maratea

“Does the US government have any role in ensuring ubiquitous, open, world-class, interconnected, reasonably-priced Internet access?” For Susan Crawford, co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard and a professor at Yeshiva University’s Cardozo School of Law, the question is rhetorical. Obviously, yes. It [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 9, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

The New York Times breaks a story alleging that the Drug Enforcement Agency has been working very closely with AT&T to access a database of phone records going as far back as 1987. According to the story, the DEA pays AT&T to station several of the company’s employees inside DEA investigative units to [...]

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In the upcoming October term, the Supreme Court will weigh in on the issue of whether police may use GPS tracking devices to watch over the movements of suspected criminals without first obtaining a warrant, or whether such activity violates an individual’s Fourth Amendment rights.  Currently, the Seventh and [...]

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A challenge to the Transportation Security Administration’s controversial full-body scans took a crash landing Friday when a federal court of appeals upheld the screenings against a slew of constitutional and statutory challenges.

Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) scans use low-intensity X-rays or radio frequencies to map an undressed image of air travelers as they [...]

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House Overturns Net Neutrality Regulation

On April 11, 2011 By Whitney Boshers

Proponents of net neutrality lost a battle on Friday. The House of Representatives, in the one-page House Joint Resolution 37, voted 240 to 179 to overturn the Federal Communication Commission’s December regulation that prohibits Internet service providers from interfering with web traffic on their broadband networks.

The FCC’s recent order, entitled “Preserving [...]

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