Currently viewing the tag: "DMCA"

Ending Revenge Porn Through Copyright

On April 3, 2014 By Philip Houten

The growth of interactive internet sites over the past couple decades has lead to the blossoming of an industry specializing in user-generated pornography. This phenomenon has become known as “Porn 2.0,” and has provided users an outlet to post photos and videos not only of themselves, but also of people who have [...]

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A controversial trade deal that would require significant revisions to both foreign and domestic intellectual property law moved forward last week as House and Senate leaders jointly introduced bills authorizing “Trade Promotion Authority” — otherwise known as fast-track approval — for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Fast-track approval is a procedural mechanism that allows [...]

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iPhone “Jailbreaking” is Fair Use

On August 2, 2010 By Theresa Weisenberger

Every three years, the U.S. Copyright Office reviews the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), and issues opinions on how it should be interpreted. The most talked about exception the Office recently released is its ruling on the legality of “jailbreaking” an iPhone. Much to Apple’s dismay, jailbreaking an iPhone is fair use, which [...]

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This week, the Southern District of New York granted summary judgment for Google in its one billion dollar case against Viacom, finding that YouTube, which is owned by Google, is protected under the safe harbor of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Viacom, along with other plaintiffs, sued YouTube for copyright infringement.

Viacom first [...]

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(Please listen to Pink Floyd’s ”Money” in the background as you read this post.)

First, let’s focus on the number one billion. That is 1,000,000,000. To YouTube, this is a very special number. It is the number of views YouTube’s website receives every single day. Another reason the number one billion makes YouTube happy [...]

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According to a recent announcement from Verizon Communications Company, the company will begin issuing “copyright notices” to customers accused of illegally downloading copyrighted material from the Internet. The notices will be sent on behalf of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and will be delivered by email or automated voice messaging. [...]

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Monday Morning JetLawg

On October 4, 2009 By JETLaw

In the news . . .

CBS receiving criticism for lack of homosexual characters on scripted shows. And in the late-night realm, David Letterman sex-scandal/extortion plot getting even more attention.

The verdict is in: Americans don’t like being tracked online.

Federal employees barred from TWD, [...]

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Monday Morning JetLawg

On September 13, 2009 By JETLaw

In the news . . .

Flickr alters its DMCA policy to preserve more user information.

Microsoft-Yahoo deal faces antitrust scrutiny.

In consideration of Monica Seles attack, U.S. Open boosts security after another player-fan incident.

Lawyer who leaked BALCO information released from prison after serving [...]

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Another iPhone App Banned from the App Store

On May 26, 2009 By JETLaw

Apple recently banned an e-book reading application called Eucalyptus from the iPhone app store. Eucalyptus doesn’t actually contain any books, but it allows users to retrieve classic books in the public domain from Project Gutenberg. Apple banned the seemingly harmless app because one of the books archived at Project Gutenberg and therefore retrievable [...]

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Electronic Arts' Online Battle Over DRM

On December 11, 2008 By Brian Van Wyk

A battle has long been underway in the virtual world; rights holders such as video game producer Electronic Arts (EA) want to protect their proprietary software to the greatest extent possible while end-users playing the games often find the means of protection, commonly known as Digital Rights Management (DRM) to be overly restrictive. DRM [...]

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