Currently viewing the tag: "Facebook"

Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 3, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Surveillance:

Tech companies win the right to report government data requests (like national security letters) in greater detail. Rand Paul plans on taking his lawsuit against the NSA to the Supreme Court. [via The Hill] The NSA hires its first Privacy and Civil Liberties Officer. [via SANSSC Magazine]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On January 27, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Patent Eligibility Symposium Wrap-Up

On Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, JETLaw hosted its 2013-2014 symposium, Patents 101: From Computer Code to Genetic Codes, focusing on what, exactly, is eligible for patent protection. Chief Judge Randall Rader of the Federal Circuit delivered the keynote address, and panels addressed software patents, gene patents, and principles of patent [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 14, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Privacy & Social Media:

California creates a minor’s right to be forgotten online. (In contrast, the EU Court of Justice found in June that EU law contains no general right to be forgotten.) [H/T Privacy, E-Commerce & Data Security's Summer 2013 Newsletter (PDF)] Google may be getting ready to use your [...]

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So far, 2013 has been anticlimactic for litigators waiting for an authoritative appellate decision addressing the rules of social media discovery. Although state and federal trial courts have established some basic parameters regarding the accessibility of private social content in litigation, there remains a conspicuous lack of appellate court guidance on the [...]

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NLRB Protects Social Net Speech by Employees

On January 29, 2013 By Brooke McLeod

As an increasing number of employees use social media like Facebook and Twitter to communicate with their coworkers, the NLRB has recently issued a series of rulings and advisories that seek to protect employee rights in a social media context. Employers often seek to discourage employees from posting comments that reflect [...]

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While the First Amendment protects most statements you make, “liking” something on Facebook does not constitute protected speech.  This April, Judge Jackson of the U.S. District Court in Norfolk, Virginia, ruled that clicking the Facebook “Like” button is not protected under the First Amendment.  In that case, a deputy sheriff, Daniel Ray [...]

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Gareth Crosskey, 21, a UK citizen was jailed for 1 year for “hacking” Selena Gomez’s Facebook account.  The FBI got involved and traced the “hack” back to the UK. According to the Police Central e-Crime Unit Mr. Crosskey was charged under UK law for violations of Section [...]

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When $2 Billion is Not Enough…

On February 11, 2012 By Andrew Harline

As you probably know by now, Facebook is going public (details and legal analysis in Thursday’s post). But, did you know that Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s CEO, is anticipated to foot the largest tax bill in US history? $2 billion. Holy cow, right? That sounds like enough money to fix a lot [...]

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As Facebook Friends Wall Street, Legal Risks Grow

On February 9, 2012 By Niels Melius

Facebook recently announced a major status update: it’s going public.  On Wednesday, February 1st, the company filed registration papers with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in what marks the first step in becoming a publicly traded company.  If all goes according to the planned timeline, the social networking site will raise at least [...]

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Watch What You Tweet

On February 2, 2012 By Marina Visan

By this point in the evolution of social media, we’ve probably all been warned to be cautious with the type of information we post and our privacy settings, especially in light of potential employers using Facebook to check on applicants.  However, two British teenagers, Leigh Van Bryan and Emily Bunting, have learned [...]

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