Currently viewing the tag: "Facebook"

As Facebook Friends Wall Street, Legal Risks Grow

On February 9, 2012 By Niels Melius

Facebook recently announced a major status update: it’s going public.  On Wednesday, February 1st, the company filed registration papers with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in what marks the first step in becoming a publicly traded company.  If all goes according to the planned timeline, the social networking site will raise at least [...]

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Watch What You Tweet

On February 2, 2012 By Marina Visan

By this point in the evolution of social media, we’ve probably all been warned to be cautious with the type of information we post and our privacy settings, especially in light of potential employers using Facebook to check on applicants.  However, two British teenagers, Leigh Van Bryan and Emily Bunting, have learned [...]

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Examining an opposing party’s social media page for damaging pictures or posts has become common practice in many trials, particularly civil trials or those where credibility is a key issue. A Facebook or MySpace picture that contradicts the image a party is attempting to portray can be helpful in swaying a jury. Although using evidence [...]

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Privacy concerns over how Facebook, Inc. uses “cookies” have led both Germany and Ireland to wage new battles against the social networking giant. “Cookies” are “small pieces of data in a person’s Web browser that record browsing behavior.”  Privacy officials in Germany and Ireland allege that the cookies Facebook [...]

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After the vast publicity surrounding the suicides of cyberbullying victims, such as Phoebe Prince and Tyler Clementi, legislators began focusing on solving this problem and deterring future occurrences of these devastating tragedies.  They believed the solution to be in the form of cyberbullying laws, which could make online statements subject to academic [...]

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Facebooking for Jurors

On September 10, 2011 By Sophia Behnia

A juror in Arlington, Texas found out the hard way that sending a Facebook friend request to the defendant in his case was a bad idea.  Jonathan Hudson was a juror in a civil auto accident trial when he decided to send a friend request to Courtney Downing, the defendant.  Downing immediately notified her [...]

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Last month I blogged about Missouri’s Amy Hestir Student Protection Act, a law which prohibits private communications between teachers and students on social media websites. Several readers shared their concerns about the vagueness and breadth of the Act in the comments. It seemed that the law was clearly running afoul of several Constitutional provisions. [...]

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Over the past decade, internet users have taken part in a continuously changing online experience.  Privacy, one of the most dynamic features of this experience, always seems to be the cause of significant shifts in online behavior.  In the beginning, there were chat rooms resembling the wild west, where users could complain, comment, [...]

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Less than a week after Facebook announced plans to enable face recognition across its social networking site, privacy groups demonstrated the gravity of their concerns about the new technology, filing a complaint that asked the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to force Facebook to end plans for the new service. The privacy groups specifically asked that the FTC stop Facebook from [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On January 31, 2011 By JETLaw

In the news. . .

Viacom agrees to pay $1.75 million for class action copyright suit related to BET’s failure to obtain proper “sync” licenses for its programs.

Mobile Resource Card, a financial services company, is suing the Kardashian sisters for walking away from a deal for prepaid celebrity-endorsed debit cards, [...]

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