Currently viewing the tag: "FBI"

“In order to preserve the character and quality of the “product,” athletes must not be paid, must be required to attend class, and the like.”

In 1984, the Supreme Court scrutinized the actions of the NCAA in the television market, declaring that the NCAA’s “monopsomy” on broadcasting rights was a violation of the Sherman Antitrust […]

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FBI College Basketball Scandal: Part Two

On March 5, 2018 By

In the fall, the college basketball world was rocked by an FBI investigation that resulted in the arrest of numerous assistant coaches and the firing of Hall of Fame coach Rick Pitino. The ratcheted up another level last week when a who’s who list of college basketball stars and programs were included in a […]

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The FBI Changes the Game in College Basketball

On September 29, 2017 By

“To others choosing to conduct business this way in the world of college athletics, we have your playbook.” With that quote, U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim changed the game for college basketball.

Before Tuesday, NCAA sanctions had failed to deter potential cheaters. The stature and financial impact that comes with making a Final Four […]

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Apple Fights Courts Over iPhone Security

On February 23, 2016 By

Should you care about protecting the data on your cellphone? What about the data on the phone of a terrorist? One technology powerhouse cares strongly about this issue and is even willing to go to (metaphorical) blows with the United States Government over the result.

On December 14th, 2015, two shooters carried out an […]

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“Emailgate?”: The Law of Hillary’s Emails

On September 18, 2015 By

Hillary Clinton apologized last week for using a private email address and server during her time as secretary of state. In an interview with David Muir of ABC News, Clinton stated, “That was a mistake. I’m sorry about that. I take responsibility.” Clinton’s apology came after months of denying any wrongdoing.

As […]

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On May 27, 2015, the U.S Department of Justice unsealed a massive indictment of fourteen officials for soccer from across the world, including top officials in FIFA. The indictment alleges widespread corruption has been going on for over the last two decades including wire fraud, money laundering, obstruction of justice charges, and bribery in regards to […]

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Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained […]

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An Issue of National Security

On October 20, 2014 By

A clash two decades in the making appears to finally be coming to a head. In response to public backlash over the National Security Agency’s (NSA) espionage tactics, tech companies are taking steps to rebuild trust with their customers by encrypting their networks end-to-end. On October 16, FBI […]

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US Magazine and People are no longer the only sources revealing intimate details about the private lives of celebrities. Over the holiday weekend, hundreds of nude celebrity photos were made available to a few million more than their intended audience. Among the stars hacked were Kate Upton, Kirsten Dunst, and most notably, Jennifer Lawrence.

The […]

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Is Bitcoin the “it” Coin?

On July 3, 2014 By

Bitcoin has taken the spotlight in the world of cryptocurrencies. Whether it’s Bitcoin’s name or a little beginner’s luck, this first attempt at cryptocurrency appears to be working and its first-mover advantage is paying off.

It’s acceptance as a viable digital currency seems to be growing every day. Beginning with Overstock.com in January, […]

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