Currently viewing the tag: "First Amendment"

In a case of first impression, the Tennessee Middle District Court recently confronted the issue of racial discrimination in reality television.  Plaintiffs Nathaniel Claybrooks and Christopher Johnson—two African American men who were denied the opportunity to be cast as The Bachelor in ABC’s reality-based dating show of the same name—filed [...]

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#McConnelling, not Coordinating

On April 2, 2014 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

#McConnelling is here to stay. Senate Minority Leader, Mitch McConnell is cool with it. No word on how Mary Kate and Ashley feel about “Uncle Mitchy.” The meme took root when Jon Stewart called attention to a video put out by Mitch McConnell for Senate. Stewart turned McConnell’s B-roll footage to his [...]

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Last week, the Sixth Circuit upheld a state law that requires Ohioans who own lions, pythons, and other dangerous animals to implant them with a microchip. The case, styled Wilkens v. Daniels, was a challenge to Ohio’s Dangerous Animals Act brought by a group of exotic animal owners who challenged the [...]

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Judging by the amount of media attention directed at Dumb Starbucks over the past few says, it is clear that comedian Nathan Fielder accomplished his main goal–getting noticed. No matter that the store was closed by the Los Angeles County Health Department on Monday, February 10. Fielder hosts a Comedy Central show called “Nathan for [...]

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FTC Hits Road Block in Patent Troll Reform

On February 4, 2014 By Mark Foley

In the wake of President Obama’s admonition of the increasing costs of patent litigation in his State of the Union, a notorious patent troll has further illuminated the need for reform. After learning that the FTC planned to file a complaint alleging deceptive trade practices, MPHJ Technology Investments preemptively Continue Reading

A controversial trade deal that would require significant revisions to both foreign and domestic intellectual property law moved forward last week as House and Senate leaders jointly introduced bills authorizing “Trade Promotion Authority” — otherwise known as fast-track approval — for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Fast-track approval is a procedural mechanism that allows [...]

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While the First Amendment protects most statements you make, “liking” something on Facebook does not constitute protected speech.  This April, Judge Jackson of the U.S. District Court in Norfolk, Virginia, ruled that clicking the Facebook “Like” button is not protected under the First Amendment.  In that case, a deputy sheriff, Daniel Ray [...]

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Electronic Arts’ Preemptive Strike

On March 2, 2012 By Andrew Farrell

Electronic Arts, Inc. (“EA”), the premier video game developer and publisher, is going on the offensive.  Its latest hit, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, was a phenomenal success, selling 8 million copies in the first month of its release.  EA wants to enjoy the hefty profits being produced and make sure that [...]

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Oklahoma Rep. Battles Violent Video Games

On February 7, 2012 By Michael Walker

By now you’re familiar with all the dangers: weight gain, desensitization, feelings of estrangement, and the wholesale degradation of America’s youth.

I’m not talking about illicit drugs. I’m talking about—users beware!—violent video games. In Oklahoma, State Representative William Fourkiller, a Democrat, is waging war against gory games. Last week, he introduced a bill [...]

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A ban on cameras in federal court hasn’t stopped WOIO-TV in Cleveland, Ohio from giving viewers a firsthand look at the scandal and intrigue unfolding during a local politician’s corruption trial. But the coverage isn’t coming from your average television reporter — instead, the station is using a fuzzy, buck-toothed squirrel puppet.

Yes, you read [...]

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