Currently viewing the tag: "First Amendment"

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral arguments on the much-awaited Golan v. Holder, a case that asks whether Congress may seize works from the public domain and restore their copyright protection.

At issue in Golan is the constitutionality of Section 514 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act [...]

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After the vast publicity surrounding the suicides of cyberbullying victims, such as Phoebe Prince and Tyler Clementi, legislators began focusing on solving this problem and deterring future occurrences of these devastating tragedies.  They believed the solution to be in the form of cyberbullying laws, which could make online statements subject to academic [...]

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Last month I blogged about Missouri’s Amy Hestir Student Protection Act, a law which prohibits private communications between teachers and students on social media websites. Several readers shared their concerns about the vagueness and breadth of the Act in the comments. It seemed that the law was clearly running afoul of several Constitutional provisions. [...]

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If someone left 8000 notes on your doorstep with threatening messages, you probably would have already called the police.  But what about when someone posts the messages from a Twitter account?

William Lawrence Cassidy has been indicted and now arrested on charges of online stalking for publishing nearly 8000 posts about [...]

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Art Imitates Life (and Violent Death) In Juarez

On February 23, 2011 By Jeremy Francis

Ubisoft’sCall of Juarez: The Cartel” has once again sparked debate over violent video games, but this time there’s a twist: players get to participate in a bloody street war that is actually occurring in their own backyard. The controversy surrounding the game is not only based on its glorification [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 21, 2011 By JETLaw

In the news. . .

J.R.R. Tolkien estate threatens lawsuit over upcoming book featuring Tolkien as a character.

Literary “scout” sues over right to be paid for discovering “Twilight.”

Boarders bankruptcy petition lists creditors that include Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group.

Congress wants to shut down “rogue” [...]

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Is a blogger a “journalist”?

On February 16, 2011 By Jordan Teague

To foster a free and independent press, most states protect the confidentiality of a journalist’s sources through “shield” laws.  When these statutes were drafted decades ago, they had “journalists” of traditional media outlets in mind.  But in the information age, is a blogger a “journalist”?

The New Jersey State Supreme Court recently heard arguments [...]

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Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder is angry. No, not about the fact that the Redskins have a losing record under his ownership. No, not about the Donovan McNabb deal that went south. Not even about the Albert Haynesworth fiasco. What’s really got Snyder up in arms is a local paper’s criticisms [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 7, 2011 By JETLaw

In the news. . .

The King’s Speech involved with American Humane Society over impermissible use of their trademarked phrase “No animals were harmed” during the film’s credits.

The Future of Music Coalition kicks off new study to determine all the ways musicians can generate revenue in today’s music landscape.

Court [...]

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But They Will Never Take. . .Our Internets!

On February 3, 2011 By Andrew Ralls

Amid growing protests of President Mubarak’s thirty-year autocratic rule, the Egyptian government has shut down the nation’s Internet and wireless networks, as well as stripped Al Jazeera of its broadcasting license and press cards. The President’s presumed goal is to abate protest organizations’ recruitment and assembly efforts via social websites and to limit [...]

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