Currently viewing the tag: "Fourth Amendment"

The United States Supreme Court recently decided Riley v. California. Two separate Amici Curiae briefs petitioning for Writ of Certiorari  (available here and herecited a note published by the Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology, continuing the journal’s impressive rise to the [...]

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The Eleventh Circuit handed down a groundbreaking decision this past week, holding in United States v. Davis that the Fourth Amendment protects information about a person’s cell site data.

Cell site data reveals a cellphone’s physical address at call origination, duration, and termination. In Davis, that information was provided [...]

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The simmering surveillance debate just hit a flash point.

On Tuesday morning, Senator Dianne Feinsten, Chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, accused the CIA of spying on Senate computers used by committee staff investigating CIA interrogation techniques. The search was supposedly focused on whether the Intelligence Committee had obtained a particular CIA report on interrogation procedures. Senator Feinstein called [...]

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The recent events surrounding Edward Snowden and the NSA surveillance program are bringing domestic law enforcement surveillance into the public consciousness. In particular, the implications of Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs), used by law enforcement agencies all over the country, are being reevaluated.

The recently implemented technology consists of a camera linked to a processing [...]

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The Cloud and Your Privacy

On March 19, 2013 By Nick Barry

Privacy concerns for cloud computing range from hackers obtaining personal information to searches by the government.  What is rarely considered are the autoscan searches routinely conducted by some cloud providers.  These autoscans usually search material when it is uploaded or downloaded.  The cloud providers accomplish this by comparing “ Continue Reading

A challenge to the Transportation Security Administration’s controversial full-body scans took a crash landing Friday when a federal court of appeals upheld the screenings against a slew of constitutional and statutory challenges.

Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) scans use low-intensity X-rays or radio frequencies to map an undressed image of air travelers as they [...]

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Here’s a travel warning you won’t get from the State Department: The Ninth Circuit last week held that police may seize digital devices at the border, transport them 170 miles to a forensics lab and search them during a two-day period, all without reasonable suspicion.

The decision marks the latest piecemeal expansion to the so-called [...]

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Do You Password Protect Your Cellphone?

On January 27, 2011 By Kevin Lumpkin

In the United States, citizens are guaranteed protection from unreasonable search and seizure by the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution. But as anyone who’s looked into Fourth Amendment jurisprudence will tell you, the most important word in that analysis is unreasonable. Courts around the country have developed a wide range of categories that [...]

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