Currently viewing the tag: "Fourth Amendment"

Now that Thanksgiving has passed and with it (to some extent) the controversy over the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) full-body scan/pat-down security procedures at airports, a similar controversy looks to be heating up in a different venue. Two courthouses in Colorado–the Douglas County Courthouse in Castle Rock, CO and the El Paso County Judicial Center [...]

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Although J. Edgar Hoover may be dead, his spirit remains alive and well.

This past Monday, the New York Times broke a story about proposed legislation that would make it easier for law enforcement to conduct wiretaps on the Internet. In essence, the legislation and accompanying regulations would mandate that all communication services, [...]

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Zuckerberg may have been onto something earlier this year when he declared that privacy is dead. Although digital privacy expectations may not be entirely dead, the California courtroom and corporate worlds have both done their part this month to bring privacy to extinction.

Apple is thinking about patenting spyware that would [...]

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Can You Track Me Now?

On September 9, 2010 By Kate Kliebert

Most of us use our cell phones daily without ever thinking that someone may be tracking where and how often we use them. A federal court of appeals, however, ruled on Thursday that the Fourth Amendment does not require government officials to have probable cause before requesting records detailing when and where a [...]

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In Paris Hilton’s third encounter with law enforcement in the past three months, she was charged with felony drug possession which could earn her probation that, if violated, comes with a one to four-year jail sentence. Late last Friday night, a Las Vegas police officer pulled over Hilton’s vehicle, driven by her boyfriend, Cy [...]

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The story unfolds like a hybrid horror or science fiction film: a serial killer called the Grim Sleeper preys on prostitutes and drug addicts, murdering them and disposing of their bodies in dumpsters and alleyways in a south Los Angeles neighborhood. The deranged man kills at least seven women in the mid-1980’s and then [...]

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Yahoo!: Defender of Privacy Rights

On April 23, 2010 By JETLaw

Privacy protection for electronic communications has been a subject of debate for some time now, so it should come as no surprise that the government continues to make controversial attempts to obtain private email communications. A recent legal controversy between Yahoo! and the Department of Justice illustrates just how far the government can go in [...]

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Teachers have long attempted to dissuade misbehavior by students–particularly those who are out of their teacher’s sight–by warning them that teachers have “eyes in the back of their heads.” Now, teachers and administrators at Harriton High School in the Lower Merion School District have actually acquired the ability to know what their students are doing [...]

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Scientists at Berkeley can read your mind.

Well, not exactly. But CNN.com reports that they are one step closer to building a mind-reading machine. The scientists used an fMRI machine to measure blood flow in the brain and tracked patterns of neural activity as subjects [...]

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The Fourth Amendment Is Great and All, But…

On September 1, 2009 By JETLaw

Bill Simmons, the popular writer for ESPN.com, recently discussed the continual leaking of information regarding steroid use in baseball in the early 2000s and compared this lingering phenomenon to, among other less savory things, an automatic debit that just cannot be canceled. The description is apt for a somewhat beguiling situation [...]

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