Currently viewing the tag: "government"

Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Proposed legislation in China–under the guise of counter terrorism–has US analysts on edge about potential protectionism or infringement on trade secrets of US tech firms. The proposed legislation is the latest development in the Chinese government’s attempts to regulate high tech companies, after regulators have enacted rules that will require firms that provide banking [...]

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Cyberspace is the new “Wild West,” according to President Obama, but the government can’t be the only sheriff in town. President Obama addressed these remarks to a crowd of tech industry leaders at a White House cybersecurity summit last week. He also signed an executive order on February 13, outlining a path for [...]

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China’s anti-trust investigation of the American chip maker Qualcomm came to an end when the chip giant agreed to pay a record fine of about $975 million last Monday. According to the decision issued by China’s National Development and Reform Commission, the royalties Qualcomm collected from Chinese smartphone manufactures were “unfair” and “excessively [...]

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On January 12, 2015 the White House announced its intention to press for new legislation that would increase consumers’ protection on the web. The Personal Data Notification & Protection Act is intended to “clarif[y] and strengthen[] the obligations companies have to notify customers when their personal information has been exposed . . . .” [...]

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Obama Weighs in on Net Neutrality

On November 19, 2014 By Elizabeth Mulkey

President Obama wants the internet to be regulated as a utility…mostly. In a November 10th video statement, Obama laid out a new plan for addressing net neutrality. He proposed that FCC reclassify broadband providers as utilities under Title II of the Telecommunications Act, like traditional phone service providers. However, Obama also wants the agency [...]

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Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

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EMV Cards Finally Coming to the US

On October 30, 2014 By Sara Hunter

On October 17, 2014, just days before Staples announced that it was investigating a “potential [security] issue,” President Obama signed an executive order to accelerate EMV adoption in the United States.

The hacking trend first began in November of 2013 when—a few days before Thanksgiving—Target’s security and payments system was hacked. In the first [...]

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GUEST POST BY:
ARIA C. SAFAR

I recently attended a conference in Portland, Oregon dedicated to the preservation of legal data in the case of litigation. Legal technology conferences are always an interesting mix of keeping up to date with “old” technology developments (at least a few years [...]

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Trouble for Qualcomm in China and the U.S.

On October 1, 2014 By Peiyuan Guo

Qualcomm, a leading wireless communications chip supplier worldwide, has emerged a winner with Apple’s iPhone 6 models. A tear-down analysis by iFixit revealed five Qualcomm chips in the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. However, the good news may be offset by Qualcomm’s lingering antitrust probe in its Chinese LTE smartphone market. Last [...]

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