Currently viewing the tag: "government"

As Brad Roberts noted in his post earlier this month, if you have turned on TV in the past month you have heard about daily fantasy sports operators. With DraftKings being the one you have most likely heard of after the over 100 million dollars they have poured into advertising this year alone. Brad covered [...]

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In February of this year, Smartflash LLC was awarded over $530 million in a judgment against Apple for willful patent infringement. The judge voided the award in July based on confusion surrounding his jury instructions which may have led to the jury miscalculate royalties. But this raises a bigger issue: in a world where new [...]

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As 2015 comes to an end, so too will the 2013 Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement. Implemented in June of 2013 by the White House’s Office of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), this three-year plan advanced the nation’s intellectual property enforcement and policy priorities. Aiming to better protect intellectual property rights domestically [...]

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No Pardon for Snowden

On August 3, 2015 By Allison Laubach

On July 28, 2015, the White House responded to a petition requesting a pardon for Edward Snowden. The petition, created over two years ago, was submitted through the government platform We the People, which requires the White House to respond to any petition that receives 100,000 signatures within 30 days of its publication.  It easily [...]

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Can the FCC Create Net Neutrality?

On April 16, 2015 By Allison Laubach

Statutory regulation of the telecommunications industry is outdated and unworkable in today’s increasingly tech-driven society.  The most recent legislation regarding the framework for telecommunications regulation, The Telecommunications Act of 1996, was passed nearly twenty years ago. The Telecommunications Act amended the Communications Act of 1934, which created the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and authorized it [...]

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The Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration was established in 1958 with the purpose of providing international protection for appellations of origin.  The Agreement sets up an international register and ensures that registered appellations receive the same protection in all member countries as they do in [...]

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Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Proposed legislation in China–under the guise of counter terrorism–has US analysts on edge about potential protectionism or infringement on trade secrets of US tech firms. The proposed legislation is the latest development in the Chinese government’s attempts to regulate high tech companies, after regulators have enacted rules that will require firms that provide banking [...]

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Cyberspace is the new “Wild West,” according to President Obama, but the government can’t be the only sheriff in town. President Obama addressed these remarks to a crowd of tech industry leaders at a White House cybersecurity summit last week. He also signed an executive order on February 13, outlining a path for [...]

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China’s anti-trust investigation of the American chip maker Qualcomm came to an end when the chip giant agreed to pay a record fine of about $975 million last Monday. According to the decision issued by China’s National Development and Reform Commission, the royalties Qualcomm collected from Chinese smartphone manufactures were “unfair” and “excessively [...]

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