Currently viewing the tag: "government"

Alibaba: King of Retail?

On September 30, 2014 By Mike Sellner

Alibaba, the Asia-based online marketplace similar to the American site Amazon.com, went public on Friday, September 19, 2014.  The initial public offering raised over $21 million on the first day of sales.  As of Wednesday, September 25, the offering reached over $25 million raised, making it the largest IPO of all time, beating [...]

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The Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) has cited Midnight Rider producers for safety violations, stemming from the tragic on-set death of twenty-seven year old camera assistant Sara Jones.

Jones was tragically killed last February on the set of Midnight Rider while the crew [...]

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Earlier this year, Facebook agreed to purchase the startup messaging company WhatsApp for $19 billion. WhatsApp has become hugely popular in the last few years due to its instant messaging capability, but without the usual carrier fees associated with text messaging, its compatibility with all major mobile operating systems, and its [...]

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Last week, a handful of Nashville songwriters ventured to Washington, DC to advocate for changes in the structure of compensation under copyright law.  The Songwriter Equity Act, introduced in both the House and Senate, aims to change the mechanics by which the government calculates songwriter pay. Currently, under U.S. Copyright law, [...]

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He’s Back!

On March 14, 2014 By Richard Saunders

It appears no one is safe from Carl Icahn, not even Silicon Valley.

The infamous activist investor is at it again, and this time eBay is the object of his disaffection.  In what has become a very public battle over recent weeks, Icahn has described eBay’s Chief Executive, John Donahoe, as [...]

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Since the leaks from whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed that the US government has been running an unprecedentedly enormous data gathering effort on basically all Americans, Congress has been slow to remove what many see as an unforgivable overreach of government power.  In fact, today’s Congress is barely even capable of Continue Reading

The popular 1980s sitcom Three’s Company revolves around three single roommates: Janet, Chrissy and Jack. When Janet develops a sudden interest in having a baby, Jack and, Chrissy hold hilarious interviews, looking for a “father” for hire. If this sitcom took place today, Janet, Jack, and Chrissy could forgo the interviews and team [...]

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Google Mapping Global Temperatures

On February 18, 2014 By Emma Stephens

In a winter where “polar vortex” has become a part of everyday vocabulary and debate over the Keystone XL pipeline has encouraged discussion of climate change, the University of East Anglia’s Climactic Research Unit has shared a data set on Google Maps (it can also be viewed on Google Earth) that Continue Reading

Exceeding Authorized Access

On February 7, 2014 By Jonathan Hoffmann

Last week the US District Court for the Northern District of California dismissed a case under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. § 1030, thereby contributing to an ever-growing debate [PDF] about the meaning of the words “exceeding authorized access.”

Despite the fact that the CFAA [...]

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The Target: Protecting Consumers’ Data

On January 22, 2014 By Rebecca Loegering

Over the holiday season, Target suffered a highly publicized data breach affecting between 70 and 110 million customers, one of the largest breaches of retail data in history. This personally identifiable data was hacked, according to Target executives, by malware installed on point-of-sale devices in Target’s checkout lines. The malicious software — [...]

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