Currently viewing the tag: "information security"

Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 24, 2014 By Brenan Salgado

Broadcast Industry

The U.S. District Court in Utah grants broadcasters’ request for a preliminary injunction against Aereo, ending Aereo’s stretch of court victories over the broadcasting industry.

Information Security

Apple patches an extremely critical security vulnerability in its iOS mobile operating system that allows a third-party to fully intercept and modify encrypted [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 17, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Surveillance & Censorship:

The Washington Post reports that documents leaked by Edward Snowden show that the NSA received intelligence from Australia’s signals intelligence division on Chicago-based law firm Mayer Brown in relation to the firm’s representation of the Indonesian government in a trade dispute. In response, Indonesia’s foreign minister Continue Reading

Exceeding Authorized Access

On February 7, 2014 By Jonathan Hoffmann

Last week the US District Court for the Northern District of California dismissed a case under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. § 1030, thereby contributing to an ever-growing debate [PDF] about the meaning of the words “exceeding authorized access.”

Despite the fact that the CFAA Continue Reading

Monday Morning JETLawg

On January 27, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Patent Eligibility Symposium Wrap-Up

On Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, JETLaw hosted its 2013-2014 symposium, Patents 101: From Computer Code to Genetic Codes, focusing on what, exactly, is eligible for patent protection. Chief Judge Randall Rader of the Federal Circuit delivered the keynote address, and panels addressed software patents, gene patents, and principles of patent [...]

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The Target: Protecting Consumers’ Data

On January 22, 2014 By Rebecca Loegering

Over the holiday season, Target suffered a highly publicized data breach affecting between 70 and 110 million customers, one of the largest breaches of retail data in history. This personally identifiable data was hacked, according to Target executives, by malware installed on point-of-sale devices in Target’s checkout lines. The malicious software — [...]

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Data Security and the Target Holiday Breach

On January 17, 2014 By John Craven

As the amount of consumer information stored and analyzed online by large corporations increases, the risk of identity theft and consumer fraud also greatly increase. In December, credit and debit card information of approximately 40 million Target customers was stolen when the Target computer systems were breached. This theft also included the personal identification [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On November 18, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

German newspaper Der Spiegel reports that British intelligence hacked into a Belgian telecoms firm using fake LinkedIn and other web pages. [H/T SANS] Wikileaks apparently publishes a leaked document detailing the intellectual property section of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement the US Trade Representative is negotiating in secret.[H/T Google News] Twitter now Continue Reading

There was a lot going on this week, so the Monday Morning JETLawg has been broken down into topics. Monday is cybercrime and cybersecurity; Tuesday is copyright, intellectual property (IP) policy generally, government technology, and government IP; Wednesday is surveillance and censorship; Thursday is sports, entertainment, and the arts; and Friday is e-currency, e-discovery, [...]

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There was a lot going on this week, so the Monday Morning JETLawg has been broken down into topics. Monday is cybercrime and cybersecurity; Tuesday is copyright, intellectual property (IP) policy generally, government technology, and government IP; Wednesday is surveillance and censorship; Thursday is sports, entertainment, and the arts; [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On November 4, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

 

An Italian magazine claims the NSA eavesdropped on Vatican communications just before Pope Benedict resigned earlier this year. The NSA denies ‘targeting’ the Vatican, despite the magazine’s claim that it placed Vatican communications into various categories: “leadership intentions, threats to the financial system, foreign policy objectives[,] and human rights.” [...]

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