Currently viewing the tag: "information security"

Can Your iPhone 5 Plead the Fifth?

On September 25, 2013 By Emily Green

With the highly anticipated release of Apple’s new iPhone comes an unexpected constitutional law question.

Apple’s iPhone 5 allows users to unlock the phone with their fingerprints. Many commentators have been quick to point out the economic and scientific implications of this new technology, but Attorney Marcia Hofmann pointed [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 9, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

The New York Times breaks a story alleging that the Drug Enforcement Agency has been working very closely with AT&T to access a database of phone records going as far back as 1987. According to the story, the DEA pays AT&T to station several of the company’s employees inside DEA investigative units to [...]

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Silicon Valley Strikes Back

On September 3, 2013 By Richard Saunders

As more information regarding the NSA’s surveillance program, dubbed X-Keyscore, trickles into the public domain, technology industry titans continue their battle with the government for increased transparency of national security requests.

Until recently, the full extent of domestic surveillance was largely unknown due to a closely guarded, secret surveillance request process. All surveillance requests [...]

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In the past year we have learned that the NSA collects information about our phone calls without using a warrant. We have also discovered that the FBI may be asking phone companies to track our calls, that camera-carrying drones are becoming more popular with businesses–and with teenagers who may use them to peer through each [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 2, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

A bill passed in New Zealand effectively bans software patents by labeling them ‘not inventions.’ A newly invented process, implemented in software, would still be patentable, but the software that implements it would not itself be patentable. Will this square New Zealand’s goal with the TRIPS Agreement’s requirement that patents be available [...]

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Proxy servers, like other technologies that facilitate anonymity, serve both good and bad interests. On the one hand, they have helped people living under oppressive regimes view otherwise-censored content. On the other hand, they are used to facilitate criminal activity, including terrorist attacks. The function of a proxy server is not complicated: you [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 26, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Lawrence Lessig sued the publisher of Phoenix’s song Lisztomania for declaratory relief, claiming fair use for his inclusion of fans’ response videos (which were set to the the song) in a lecture posted to YouTube. He has some of the four fair use factors in his favor, including effect [...]

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DNA’s Month in Court

On June 21, 2013 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

June has been an interesting month for DNA at the Supreme Court and for technology and the law generally.  Justice Scalia demonstrated his own signature brand of judicial restraint by declining to sign on to those aspects of last Thursday’s Myriad Genetics decision that explained “fine details of molecular biology.”  [...]

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By now you’ve undoubtedly heard about the National Security Agency’s collection and monitoring of billions  of Americans’ phone records and internet activity from nine of the largest US internet service providers in attempts to root out terrorism.  Ever since the story was reported in The Guardian, the program has been met with outrage from legislators [...]

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