Currently viewing the tag: "intellectual property"

Former Cardinals scouting director Chris Correa plead guilty to five of twelve charges relating to the 2014 hacking of the Astros’ computer network.  The database Correa hacked into contained scouting reports, statistics, and trade discussions.  Three months before the draft, in March of 2013, Correa downloaded the Astros’ rankings for all players eligible for [...]

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Last week, four executives of Shenzhen QVOD Technology Inc., a Chinese online peer-to-peer video-hosting platform, stood trial in Beijing. It was alleged that the company allowed pornographic websites to access its streaming technology and approximately 21,000 pornographic materials have been distributed on three servers run by QVOD. The four executives, who pleaded not guilty, [...]

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In Internet Patents Corp v. Active Network, the Federal Circuit considered yet another case involving a claim of patent ineligibility under 35 U.S.C. 101. The patents at issue were owned by Internet Patents Corporation, a non-practicing entity, and essentially related to “the use of a conventional web browser Back and Forward navigational functionalities [...]

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This is the digital age of music. From hip-hop and R&B to techno and dancehall genres, artists more frequently create music using programs rather than people. Even artists who create music using traditional acoustic instruments frequently convert their sound to electronically marketable media. The result is an immense collection of intellectual property. Accordingly, artists would [...]

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“I was high and drunk.” Not always the best thing to admit in a deposition, but in the recently released deposition videos from the “Blurred Lines” trial, Robin Thicke did just that.  With the case heading towards appeal, the video footage was released Monday of both Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ depositions.  While transcripts [...]

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Introduction

For more than sixty years, celebrities have used their right of publicity to prevent others from making unauthorized commercial uses of their personas, most commonly in the form of a celebrity’s portrait, photograph or signature. Despite its importance to celebrities seeking to tightly control the appropriation of their likeness, the right of publicity occupies [...]

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In February of this year, Smartflash LLC was awarded over $530 million in a judgment against Apple for willful patent infringement. The judge voided the award in July based on confusion surrounding his jury instructions which may have led to the jury miscalculate royalties. But this raises a bigger issue: in a world where new [...]

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As 2015 comes to an end, so too will the 2013 Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement. Implemented in June of 2013 by the White House’s Office of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), this three-year plan advanced the nation’s intellectual property enforcement and policy priorities. Aiming to better protect intellectual property rights domestically [...]

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Beijing won its bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics last week, but since then, “The Snow and Ice Dance,” one of the 9 official songs Bejing used for its campaign, has been questioned for plagiarism. Some Internet users and media believed that the song is substantially similar to “Let It Go” [...]

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As is common knowledge in the patent world, this past May, the Federal Circuit upheld a Northern District of California jury verdict in favor of Apple, against Samsung in Apple Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (Fed. Cir. 2015) with relation to Apple’s design and utility patent claims. This was a massive victory for Apple, and [...]

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