Currently viewing the tag: "intellectual property"

Tensions Flare in the Ongoing “Narcos” IP Battle

On September 29, 2017 By cmfoote

Tensions have reached a new high in the ongoing Narcos IP battle after the brother of deceased drug kingpin Pablo Escobar suggested that the show should hire “hitmen” to serve as security for the production. This comes in the wake of the shooting death in Mexico of a location scout for the hit Netflix [...]

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In November, the Supreme Court will hear argument on whether Inter Partes Reviews (IPRs), one of the most influential changes of the American Invents Act, are an unconstitutional taking of property.  IPRs are a post-issuance review of patent validity before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB). This administrative trial before a panel of [...]

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Record Labels Sue YouTube Audio-Ripping Website

On October 17, 2016 By dsowder

Record labels, in their continuing fight against music pirating, have taken aim at an audio-ripping website that undercuts the legal purchase of music. Several major music labels, including Universal, Capitol, Warner Bros, and Sony, have filed a lawsuit against the website Youtube-mp3.org (“YTMP3”) alleging that the site is responsible for direct, contributory, and vicarious [...]

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On February 9, 2016, the London-based British luxury apparel brand, Burberry, filed a lawsuit against J.C. Penney Corp. The lawsuit, filed in the Southern District of New York, alleged that J.C. Penney infringed upon Burberry’s trademark of its signature “Burberry check” pattern. The complaint also contained allegations of federal counterfeiting, and multiple other state [...]

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Former Cardinals scouting director Chris Correa plead guilty to five of twelve charges relating to the 2014 hacking of the Astros’ computer network.  The database Correa hacked into contained scouting reports, statistics, and trade discussions.  Three months before the draft, in March of 2013, Correa downloaded the Astros’ rankings for all players eligible for [...]

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Last week, four executives of Shenzhen QVOD Technology Inc., a Chinese online peer-to-peer video-hosting platform, stood trial in Beijing. It was alleged that the company allowed pornographic websites to access its streaming technology and approximately 21,000 pornographic materials have been distributed on three servers run by QVOD. The four executives, who pleaded not guilty, [...]

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In Internet Patents Corp v. Active Network, the Federal Circuit considered yet another case involving a claim of patent ineligibility under 35 U.S.C. 101. The patents at issue were owned by Internet Patents Corporation, a non-practicing entity, and essentially related to “the use of a conventional web browser Back and Forward navigational functionalities [...]

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This is the digital age of music. From hip-hop and R&B to techno and dancehall genres, artists more frequently create music using programs rather than people. Even artists who create music using traditional acoustic instruments frequently convert their sound to electronically marketable media. The result is an immense collection of intellectual property. Accordingly, artists would [...]

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“I was high and drunk.” Not always the best thing to admit in a deposition, but in the recently released deposition videos from the “Blurred Lines” trial, Robin Thicke did just that.  With the case heading towards appeal, the video footage was released Monday of both Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ depositions.  While transcripts [...]

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Introduction

For more than sixty years, celebrities have used their right of publicity to prevent others from making unauthorized commercial uses of their personas, most commonly in the form of a celebrity’s portrait, photograph or signature. Despite its importance to celebrities seeking to tightly control the appropriation of their likeness, the right of publicity occupies [...]

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