Currently viewing the tag: "intellectual property"

In February of this year, Smartflash LLC was awarded over $530 million in a judgment against Apple for willful patent infringement. The judge voided the award in July based on confusion surrounding his jury instructions which may have led to the jury miscalculate royalties. But this raises a bigger issue: in a world where new [...]

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As 2015 comes to an end, so too will the 2013 Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement. Implemented in June of 2013 by the White House’s Office of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), this three-year plan advanced the nation’s intellectual property enforcement and policy priorities. Aiming to better protect intellectual property rights domestically [...]

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Beijing won its bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics last week, but since then, “The Snow and Ice Dance,” one of the 9 official songs Bejing used for its campaign, has been questioned for plagiarism. Some Internet users and media believed that the song is substantially similar to “Let It Go” [...]

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As is common knowledge in the patent world, this past May, the Federal Circuit upheld a Northern District of California jury verdict in favor of Apple, against Samsung in Apple Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (Fed. Cir. 2015) with relation to Apple’s design and utility patent claims. This was a massive victory for Apple, and [...]

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The Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration was established in 1958 with the purpose of providing international protection for appellations of origin.  The Agreement sets up an international register and ensures that registered appellations receive the same protection in all member countries as they do in [...]

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Taylor Swift removed her entire music catalogue from Spotify.  A few months later, Jay-Z bought a Swedish music streaming service for $56 million. If streaming services and record companies didn’t rush to the war room, it wasn’t for lack of notice. Clearly change was coming.

On Monday, Jay-Z announced the launch of Tidal, [...]

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In the past few years, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has received numerous trademark applications for phrases created from political and social movements. Currently, the USPTO is considering two trademark applications for “Je Suis Charlie,” a phrase created in response to the terrorist attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo, in [...]

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Universal, free access to the law is a prerequisite to open participation in government. Without an opportunity to access the law, citizens have no way to comprehend the rules that bind them. However, the relatively unknown practice of incorporation by reference (IBR) allows private organizations to charge for access to [...]

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Is Streaming Speech?

On March 3, 2015 By Chastity Bobo

Pandora had long thought it could use pre-1972 recordings free of charge, but the rock band The Turtles are trying to prove them wrong. Last week, Judge Philip S. Gutierrez denied Pandora’s motion to dismiss.  This is not the first time the signers from the Turtles, suing as Flo & Eddie, Inc., have been successful against [...]

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China’s anti-trust investigation of the American chip maker Qualcomm came to an end when the chip giant agreed to pay a record fine of about $975 million last Monday. According to the decision issued by China’s National Development and Reform Commission, the royalties Qualcomm collected from Chinese smartphone manufactures were “unfair” and “excessively [...]

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