Currently viewing the tag: "JETLaw"

In November, 2018, Ohio announced that it will allow businesses to pay state taxes in Bitcoin. The state Treasurer’s office will not actually collect Bitcoin; instead, taxpayers will send their Bitcoin to a private third party processor who will in turn send cash to the Treasurer’s office on the taxpayers’ behalf. There is […]

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Do you own your virtual property?

On November 3, 2018 By

In 2005, Chinese gamer Qiu Chengwei was sentenced to life in prison for murdering his competitor Zhu Caoyuan. A dispute arose between the two over a virtual sword used in the online video game Legend of Mir 3. After investing significant time and resources to obtain the virtual sword, Qiu lent it to Zhu. […]

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No one ever said that you had to attach your identity to your online postings. In fact, many websites function based on the assumption that users have a right to speak anonymously. For example, Reddit, Twitter, and WordPress are often used by anonymous speakers based on this very assumption. Many of these topics benefit from—or […]

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Airbnb’s two slogans “live like a local” and “belong anywhere” give a sense of the company’s unique value proposition, that instead of checking into a corporate hotel, travelers can nestle their way in a new city among the natives. Airbnb, a home-sharing app and website founded in 2008, has revolutionized the way people […]

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Passthoughts and the Creation of New Human Rights

On November 3, 2017 By

Apple’s latest facial identification technology has set much of the tech world abuzz; while many have lauded Apple’s technological prowess, others have expressed concern over user privacy and the potential for violations of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments. Facial recognition may not be at the forefront of authentication technology for long, however. The next […]

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On September 7th, 2017, Equifax announced it suffered a massive data breach, compromising the personal information, including credit card numbers and social security details, of at least 145.5 million people. Most consumers breached are citizens of the United States, but a few were from the UK and Canada. The Equifax breach is a […]

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$59.99 for a smartphone sounds like a great deal.  But what if your text messages, call histories, and physical location would be sent to servers in China?

On November 15, 2016, U.S. security firm Kryptowire reported that firmware on certain Blu Products phones was transmitting users’ personal data to servers […]

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Space Tourism: Get Ready for the Ride of Your Life

On October 17, 2016 By

What do you want to be when you grow up? Historically, one of the most popular responses to the previous question has been astronaut. With the ending of the Space Shuttle program, this dream seemed to be more unattainable than ever. Fear not, for “when one door closes, another opens,” enter: Space Tourism.

While you […]

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The Ninth Circuit Does Not Feel the Burn

On March 17, 2016 By

Bikram Choudhury’s famous sequence of twenty-six yoga poses and two breathing exercises—which is performed over ninety minutes in a humid, 105-degree room—is not copyrightable, says the Ninth Circuit. Choudhury, the self-proclaimed “Yogi to the stars,” popularized this form of “hot yoga” after emigrating to Beverly Hills in the early 1970s, and he detailed the […]

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And the 2015 award for most influential class of wage equality spokeswomen goes to — Hollywood actresses.  Patricia Arquette’s passionate Oscar acceptance speech this past February demanding gender wage equality was met with cheers, standing ovation, and increased conversation on the topic around the country.  More recently, the Sony hack revealed a huge pay […]

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