Currently viewing the tag: "JETLaw"

And the 2015 award for most influential class of wage equality spokeswomen goes to — Hollywood actresses.  Patricia Arquette’s passionate Oscar acceptance speech this past February demanding gender wage equality was met with cheers, standing ovation, and increased conversation on the topic around the country.  More recently, the Sony hack revealed a huge pay [...]

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As Brad Roberts noted in his post earlier this month, if you have turned on TV in the past month you have heard about daily fantasy sports operators. With DraftKings being the one you have most likely heard of after the over 100 million dollars they have poured into advertising this year alone. Brad covered [...]

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Tweet Trimming

On September 30, 2015 By Robyn Taylor

What does the number 140 mean to you? It may mean nothing, or, for all you Twitter followers, it may be the annoying limit that forces you to truncate tweets. One way Twitter has helped facilitate this 140 character count is by using Twitter link shorteners. These shorteners reduce the length of posted links. [...]

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That a person would admit to a crime he didn’t commit seems an improbable occurrence, and yet false confessions are responsible for more than a quarter of the 330 DNA exonerations secured by the Innocence Project to date. In order to reduce the prevalence of false confessions, the Innocence Project and other advocacy groups have [...]

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The Seventh Circuit recently held that a class of plaintiffs had standing to sue for the risk of injury caused by the exposure of 350,000 customers’ credit card information to malware by Neiman Marcus in Remijas v. Neiman Marcus Group, LLC. The court distinguished Clapper v. Amnesty Int’l USA, 133 S.Ct. 1138, 1147 [...]

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As is common knowledge in the patent world, this past May, the Federal Circuit upheld a Northern District of California jury verdict in favor of Apple, against Samsung in Apple Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (Fed. Cir. 2015) with relation to Apple’s design and utility patent claims. This was a massive victory for Apple, and [...]

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To paraphrase the old riddle, when is monopolistic behavior not monopolistic behavior? This question had been argued in federal courts often; yet, when confronted with this riddle, the federal judiciary had reached inconsistent results. In 2013, with its holding in FTC v. Actavis, 570 U.S. ____ (2013), the Supreme Court believed it laid out a [...]

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The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia has ordered Atlas Logistics Group Retail Services LLC to pay two employees $2.23 million. Why? Because Atlas forced employees Jack Lowe and Dennis Reynolds to take DNA tests in a bid to determine who was continuously defecating in the workplace.

Apparently, a mystery employee [...]

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The NCAA and Academic Integrity

On April 9, 2015 By Rebecca Loegering

In October, the University of North Carolina released an internal report detailing widespread academic fraud. The report, however, was not the end of trouble for UNC, or for the NCAA. In January of this year, two former UNC student athletes filed suit against both UNC and the NCAA related to the academic fraud.

The [...]

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Taylor Swift removed her entire music catalogue from Spotify.  A few months later, Jay-Z bought a Swedish music streaming service for $56 million. If streaming services and record companies didn’t rush to the war room, it wasn’t for lack of notice. Clearly change was coming.

On Monday, Jay-Z announced the launch of Tidal, [...]

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