Currently viewing the tag: "Lanham Act"

Paparazzi snap a photo of a public figure using a product.  The photo is posted online.  The company who produces the product tweets the photo, excited to show a well-known person uses its product.  Does the public figure have a legitimate claim that his or her right of publicity has been violated? [...]

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Last month, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office fired a shot across the bow of Dan Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins football club. Over the past 20 years, numerous parties have tried to persuade the NFL franchise to change its team name, arguing that the term “redskin” is racist and offensive [...]

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“The Situation” Has A Trademark Situation

On September 17, 2010 By Jenn Weizenecker

Recently, Jersey Shore cast members have suffered some trademark grenades. In August, Snooki attempted to register her nickname for use on the books, but the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) refused to register “Snooki” due to a likelihood of confusion with the cartoon cat “Snooky” from the children’s book, Adventures of Snooky; Under [...]

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Snooki in a Trademark Catfight

On August 20, 2010 By Jenn Weizenecker

Recently, Nicole Polizzi, better known as “Snooki” from the hit MTV reality show, Jersey Shore, endured some hairballs when she was arrested for disorderly conduct and ridiculed for her anti-Obama statement about the tanning tax.

The newest drama involves a cartoon cat named “Snooky” from the children’s book [...]

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Former Talking Heads Frontman David Byrne has sued Florida Governor Charlie Crist, alleging Crist used the Talking Heads song, “Road to Nowhere” without permission in a Senate campaign ad. The suit accuses Mr. Crist of copyright infringement and false endorsement, and seeks $1 million in damages.

The song first appeared in [...]

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Lions, Tigers and Bears, oh my! It is not uncommon for professional sports teams to be named after courageous, cunning, or speedy animals (or maybe pretty birds in the case of the Blue Jays and Cardinals), but some teams opt to honor notable characters from history like the Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Pirates and Texas Rangers, [...]

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It’s the age-old story: artist puts out album, Pitchfork loves album, another artist claims right to use the artist’s name. Okay, so maybe it’s not that common of a tale, but it’s been the subject of more than a few confused news articles. Some recent examples: in 2004, Manitoba mastermind Dan Snaith changed [...]

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Google's Dukes Back Up Again

On July 10, 2009 By JETLaw

It seems like only yesterday when May flowers were still just blooming and your wild and magical night at the Stonehenge Summer Solstice was still to come in the glorious future, when we were discussing the fall-out from one class action lawsuit [...]

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When does a television program cease to be a documentary, and instead become an infomercial hawking a product? This question will likely be posed to a jury following the recent Third Circuit opinion in the case of Facenda v. N.F.L. Films, Inc. On September 9, 2008, the Third Circuit unanimously ruled [...]

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