Currently viewing the tag: "medicine"

The popular 1980s sitcom Three’s Company revolves around three single roommates: Janet, Chrissy and Jack. When Janet develops a sudden interest in having a baby, Jack and, Chrissy hold hilarious interviews, looking for a “father” for hire. If this sitcom took place today, Janet, Jack, and Chrissy could forgo the interviews and team [...]

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Legal Battles Over Healthcare.gov?

On November 4, 2013 By Elizabeth Mulkey

Despite excitement over creative marketing strategies (“brosurance,” anyone?), the launch of the Affordable Care Act hasn’t gone as planned. The new Healthcare.gov website has faced technical difficulties since it went live on October 1st. The website is intended to be the main way to sign up for one of the government’s health [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 28, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

NSA accused of spying on Germany; Idaho fed. court takes the word ‘hacking’ a bit too literally; Cheney’s defibrillator security

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EU E-Cig Regulations Go Up in… Vapor?

On October 11, 2013 By Jacob Marshall

This week, the EU Parliament chose to tighten regulations on cigarettes. Not only did it approve a plan to require “scare” warnings on 65% of tobacco packages, but it also banned flavored cigarettes, including menthol (though the ban does not take effect until 2022). However, Parliament chose not to regulate E-cigarettes as a medicine, [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 30, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

U.S.-Iranian Twitter diplomacy, LexisNexis and Dun & Bradstreet are hacked, NSA employees cyberstalk lovers, and NSA reform bills

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Typically in patent litigation, the patent holder bears the burden of proving that the defendant infringed.  The Federal Circuit recently created a limited exception to that rule in Medtronic, Inc. v. Boston Scientific Corp. (Fed. Cir. 2012) (PDF). It held that when a licensee in good standing seeks a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, [...]

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With the Affordable Health Care Act (ACA) signed into law, there will be approximately 30 million new health care patients in the United States. With such an influx, it would be natural to assume that doctors are looking forward to raking in the extra money that will come from their increased visits. Instead, doctors [...]

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Big Data Promises Big Predictions

On February 5, 2013 By Lizzie Maratea

The saying goes, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”  Two researchers have ventured to learn the cadence.  Armed with a New York Times 22-year archive and readily accessible online sources (e.g., Wikipedia, OpenCyc, FreeBase, GeoNames), researchers from Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and Microsoft Research have developed a prototype predictive model to forecast [...]

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“Doc, where’s my flat screen TV?”

On January 21, 2013 By Swathi Padmanabhan

Since the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, policymakers and hospital management professionals have sought to curb rising health care costs while simultaneously offering care to more individuals nationwide. The idea is that more efficient health care will reduce costs, thereby enabling the government to use the surplus funds in the national health [...]

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Last Tuesday, Los Angeles County voters approved Local Measure B, also known as the “Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act,” covering the adult film industry with another layer of regulation.  The measure follows similar regulations enacted by the City of Los Angeles earlier in 2012 by requiring actors in adult films produced [...]

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