Currently viewing the tag: "music"

The Wu-Tang Clan’s latest—and perhaps last—collective musical endeavor has been six years in the making, will be sold exclusively to one (very wealthy) buyer, and will only be released commercially after 88 years. Anyone reading this now will likely never see that day. Why such extremes? “Art is extreme,” group leader RZA says. “For [...]

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Is Streaming Speech?

On March 3, 2015 By Chastity Bobo

Pandora had long thought it could use pre-1972 recordings free of charge, but the rock band The Turtles are trying to prove them wrong. Last week, Judge Philip S. Gutierrez denied Pandora’s motion to dismiss.  This is not the first time the signers from the Turtles, suing as Flo & Eddie, Inc., have been successful against [...]

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Copyright law and popular music can sometimes appear to be strange bedfellows. The Founders were not likely to have intended this tension, given the fact that “promot[ing] the . . . useful Arts,” is followed by a phrase that limits the exclusive right to use, only “securing [it] for limited Times to Authors and Inventors.” [...]

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With the advent of digital music and streaming platforms, recording artists must think outside the box to make a living. With free streaming services taking the lead in how young listeners (legally) consume music, artists have watched their income from music sales shrink substantially. While an artist can see a whole $8 in revenue from [...]

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This week, Taylor Swift shocked her fans and the music industry by removing all of her songs from Spotify. The move was seen as an effort to drive up sales of her new album, 1989, but the decision also appears to reflect her belief that artists should be able to set their price points for [...]

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This past week, Taylor Swift dropped her new album 1989—and so far, it has received positive reviews from fans and critics alike. In fact, according to Billboard, 1989 is on track to sell 1.2 million copies in its opening week, qualifying the album as “platinum” under the standards set by the Recording Industry [...]

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In what is turning into a publicity circus for popular EDM group Krewella, former bandmate Kris Trindl, better known by his performance moniker “Rain Man,” is suing the remaining members of the group, sisters Jahan and Yasmine Yousef, for $5 million. The suit arises from Trindl’s apparent forced exodus from the group, which [...]

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They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Unfortunately, imitation—or rather artistic inspiration—has landed R&B singer Robin Thicke and super-producer Pharrell Williams in quite the legal brouhaha.

Since August 2013, there’s been an ongoing legal battle over the similarities between Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” and Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up.” Over a [...]

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Jay-Z Fights One-Syllable Infringement Lawsuit

On September 23, 2014 By Kelsey Zottnick

A single syllable could hold major implications for the future of music sampling.

The disputed syllable, “oh,” is the subject of a recent lawsuit filed against rapper Jay-Z, Atlantic Records, and Roc-a-fella. The suit alleges that Jay-Z took the micro-sample from bluesman Eddie Bo’s “Hook & Sling Part I” for use [...]

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Last week, a handful of Nashville songwriters ventured to Washington, DC to advocate for changes in the structure of compensation under copyright law.  The Songwriter Equity Act, introduced in both the House and Senate, aims to change the mechanics by which the government calculates songwriter pay. Currently, under U.S. Copyright law, [...]

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