Currently viewing the tag: "NCAA"

Distraught fans of the former 2K Sports NFL video game franchise may finally have their day in court, nearly seven years after EA Sports locked up an exclusive license to produce video games featuring NFL teams and players. In 2004, a year during which EA Sports’ Madden NFL 2005 sold for $50 and [...]

Continue Reading

It’s Treeson! The Sad Story of Toomer’s Trees

On February 24, 2011 By JETLaw

When I last wrote, the NCAA was investigating Auburn University’s star quarterback, Cam Newton, for allegedly violating NCAA policies. Since that time, the NCAA suspended Cam Newton in a largely symbolic gesture, reinstated him a day later, and Auburn went on to win the National Championship. As the old saying goes, all’s well that ends [...]

Continue Reading

Don’t Mess With Utah?

On October 26, 2010 By Charles Michels

In early 2009, Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff couldn’t take it anymore. After he watched the Utah Utes football program go undefeated in the regular season for the second time in five years, he believed that the Utes deserved a place in the NCAA’s BCS title game. However, just like in 2004, the Utes [...]

Continue Reading

Money talks. So do shady sports agents, apparently. The most recent edition of Sports Illustrated contains one agent’s confession regarding the dirty-side of being a sports agent — paying off college athletes as a means of gaining clientele. NCAA bylaws prohibit collegiate players from receiving such improper benefits [...]

Continue Reading

The NCAA has long been criticized for being a dictatorial, almost totalitarian regime in how it deals with its member institutions. The criticism has bordered on antitrust issues with regards to postseason play, recruiting rules, as well as media rights and funding. When it comes to college basketball, many schools have been critical of officials [...]

Continue Reading

Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 4, 2010 By JETLaw

In the news…

Second Circuit rules pure music download not a “public performance” under copyright law in U.S. v. ASCAP.

New anti-piracy legislation seeks to get Google on board to stop websites that promote copyright infringement.

Death of student, Tyler Clementi, raises new issues for technology on college campuses.

[...]

Continue Reading

A federal judge has weighed in on a debate that runs rampant through the halls of many high schools:Is cheerleading a sport? The question presented itself when the Quinnipac University‘s women’s volleyball team sued the school for an alleged violation of Title IX. The university had recently announced it was eliminating the volleyball [...]

Continue Reading

Monday Morning JETLawg

On May 31, 2010 By JETLaw

In the news…

Reminiscent of music industry tycoons, producers of “The Hurt Locker” sue BitTorrent users for illegal downloading of the film.

Gary McKinnon, computer hacker that breached Department of Defense and NASA websites, fights extradition to the United States.

Woman’s war against Adobe demonstrates the advantages of Continue Reading

Well, it finally happened. America’s second-oldest institution for higher education has decided on its mascot. The College of William & Mary, founded by King William III and Queen Mary II of England in 1693, has once again changed its mascot. The winner . . . (drum roll please) . . . a “ Continue Reading

As March Madness wrapped up last week, the NCAA unveiled a proposal to expand the men’s basketball tournament to 96 teams, an increase of 31 from the current 65-team competition. Although the plan has not been confirmed, it appears likely the NCAA will adopt the expansion by next season.

While the [...]

Continue Reading