Currently viewing the tag: "patents"

JETLaw’s 2013-2014 symposium, Patents 101: From Computer Code to Genetic Codes, will take place next Friday, Jan. 24th, at Vanderbilt Law School. The symposium focuses on what, exactly, is eligible for patent protection. Chief Judge Randall Rader of the Federal Circuit will deliver the keynote, and panels will address software patents, [...]

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What Do You Think About Patent Subject Matter Eligibility?

On Friday, January 24th, JETLaw will host its symposium on patent-eligible subject matter, Patents 101: From Computer Code to Genetic Codes. (Details below.) Should courts care whether patented processes are implemented in software? Should software be considered unpatentable as an “algorithm”? Should any [...]

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Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International

In 2005, the Australian company Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. filed a patent application with the US Patent and Trademark Office for a method of reducing financial risk by ensuring, through “data processing systems” and third-party exchanges, that counterparties make good on their obligations. In 2010, [...]

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Thanks to our authors for a great semester full of legal analysis across intellectual property, entertainment, and technology law. This will be our last regularly scheduled post of the semester. We head into final exams right after the Thanksgiving break. Good luck, everyone!

Google announces that it will Continue Reading

Using Antitrust to Fight PAEs

On November 19, 2013 By Shannon Han

Due to its nature as a right to exclude, a patent can have a powerful effect on the market. Though in theory the patent is meant to serve a defensive function, some have chosen to use it as a more offensive tool: obtaining questionable royalties from inadvertent infringers, or raising a competitor’s operating costs. It [...]

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The 2013-2014 JETLaw Symposium, “Patents 101: Eligibility from Computer Code to Genetic Codes” will be held at Vanderbilt Law School on Friday, January 24th, 2014. The Symposium examines the interaction of Section 101 and patent eligibility of software and DNA, as well as the implication of current jurisprudence on patent eligible [...]

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Last Wednesday, a bill was introduced in the House that could possibly end patent trolling as we know it. Judiciary Comittee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) introduced the “Innovation Act of 2013,” which would significantly amend the patent enforcement process with the goals of curbing [...]

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Do Supreme Court Justices Dream of Electric Sheep?

On October 24, 2013 By Thomas Hayden

Back in June, the Supreme Court decided Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, 569 U.S. ___, 133 S. Ct. 2107 (2013) (which we previously wrote about here). Myriad was a unanimous decision in which the Court ruled that naturally occurring isolated DNA cannot be patented, but that [...]

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