Currently viewing the tag: "patents"

A little over a month ago, Acting Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office Teresa Stanek Rea announced that the opening of a Silicon Valley satellite office of the USPTO would be delayed, explaining: ”Given current budget constraints under sequestration, our efforts to move into permanent spaces for those three [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 2, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

A bill passed in New Zealand effectively bans software patents by labeling them ‘not inventions.’ A newly invented process, implemented in software, would still be patentable, but the software that implements it would not itself be patentable. Will this square New Zealand’s goal with the TRIPS Agreement’s requirement that patents be available [...]

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Wednesday Morning JETLawg

On August 28, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

There were a lot of items this week, so we are publishing an additional JETLawg:

Confirming that we have one foot in the utopian and one foot in the dystopian future, credit card thieves in Australia are apparently using 3D printers to make virtually undetectable ATM skimmers. These devices “skim” copies of the magnetic [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On July 29, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Thanks to our authors from the class of 2014 for a great summer full of analysis! We covered a wide range of legal issues in the areas of entertainment and technology. Check our blog archive for the full coverage.

Fox loses its appeal for an injunction to block Dish Networks’ commercial-skipping [...]

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Pharmaceutical companies, the Federal Trade Commission, and antitrust and intellectual property attorneys waited with bated breath for the Supreme Court’s monumental decision on the legality of reverse-payment settlements, announced in FTC v. Actavis. On June 17, 2013, everyone got their answer… or did they?

What happened?

In March, this blog outlined [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On July 1, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Note: JETLaw staff is off for the week. Happy Fourth of July!

 

 

FISA court allows Google and Microsoft to publish procedural details of their lawsuits seeking the right to be more specific about the number of national security requests they receive. WIPO pulls together support for the [...]

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Trolling for Trouble

On June 27, 2013 By Samantha Taylor

Fairy tale trolls and patent trolls share more than just a name.  Both gather property of sorts–trolls gather trees and livestock from fields, and patent trolls gather patents.  Neither serves a productive purpose–trolls destroy everything in their paths and patent trolls use the threat of lawsuits to prevent industrious [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On June 24, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

The United States and Russia agree to establish a cyber hotline aimed at reducing the risk of cyber conflict and misunderstandings. Many are drawing analogies to the Cold War-era nuclear hotline, and in fact the new cyber hotline will be built on top of that communications framework. NSA leaker Snowden is [...]

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DNA’s Month in Court

On June 21, 2013 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

June has been an interesting month for DNA at the Supreme Court and for technology and the law generally.  Justice Scalia demonstrated his own signature brand of judicial restraint by declining to sign on to those aspects of last Thursday’s Myriad Genetics decision that explained “fine details of molecular biology.”  [...]

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SCOTUS Decides Myriad

On June 19, 2013 By Parker Hancock

Last Thursday, the Supreme Court held that some forms of DNA are patent-eligible in its long-awaited opinion, Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.. Following Chakrabarty, the Supreme Court ruled that naturally occurring DNA is not patent-eligible, however cDNA, a form of DNA artificially created in a lab [...]

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