Currently viewing the tag: "privacy"

No one ever said that you had to attach your identity to your online postings. In fact, many websites function based on the assumption that users have a right to speak anonymously. For example, Reddit, Twitter, and WordPress are often used by anonymous speakers based on this very assumption. Many of these topics benefit from—or [...]

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Discovering information about your ancestors who lived thousands of years ago has never been easier. After receiving a small amount of your saliva, DNA genetic testing websites like 23andMe and Ancestry.com provide you with detailed results about your lineage. The emailed results from 23andMe give users a percentage breakdown of their ancestry composition [...]

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Several federal circuits are tackling the issue whether the Government’s authority to search persons and property at the border, without a warrant, and often, without any suspicion, includes individuals’ electronic devices. The Fourth and Ninth Circuits have held that the Fourth Amendment requires at least reasonable suspicion for forensic searches of electronic devices [...]

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Facebook dominated headlines last Friday when it formally suspended Cambridge Analytica, a British consulting firm known for its electoral data analysis and strategy implementation, from its site over allegations that it improperly received and retained tens of millions of Facebook user data from a researcher who had obtained the data legally through proper channels. While [...]

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No National Security Breach Notification Laws?

On March 2, 2018 By ejhyla

Last September, Equifax announced that their servers had been breached, resulting in the theft of around 150 million Americans’ social security numbers. The kicker for many was that, on top of a lost sense of security in ones financial future, Equifax was slow to tell anybody about the breach and, when they finally did, [...]

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Passthoughts and the Creation of New Human Rights

On November 3, 2017 By scrupe

Apple’s latest facial identification technology has set much of the tech world abuzz; while many have lauded Apple’s technological prowess, others have expressed concern over user privacy and the potential for violations of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments. Facial recognition may not be at the forefront of authentication technology for long, however. The next [...]

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Along with its announcement of the iPhone X, Apple revealed that a new technology would be utilized by users to unlock their phones. Due to the lack of a button, Apple’s Touch ID software could no longer be used, thus Apple introduced Face ID. Users will now simply need to look their phone in the [...]

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Amid reports of police shootings of unarmed, mostly black, individuals and the waves of accompanying protests, police body cameras have gained favor as a tool to make police-citizen interactions more transparent. Studies have shown that body cameras have decreased the number of complaints against police officers and use-of-force incidents. Additionally, one study has [...]

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Meitu: fun new app or serious threat to your privacy?

On January 30, 2017 By ebailey

Should phone apps be able to track your location and share information without asking for these permissions? Even if they ask for these permissions should they be allowed to use this information considering most people do not read the content associated with the agreements they sign?

 

Meitu, a photo-editing app, has been in the [...]

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In the last twenty-four hours, have you logged onto Facebook or Google and uploaded a picture?  Walked into a retail store or past a billboard advertisement on the streets? If you have, chances are a company may have collected personal data with the use of facial recognition technology without you even knowing. Facial recognition technology [...]

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