Currently viewing the tag: "privacy"

Cyberspace is the new “Wild West,” according to President Obama, but the government can’t be the only sheriff in town. President Obama addressed these remarks to a crowd of tech industry leaders at a White House cybersecurity summit last week. He also signed an executive order on February 13, outlining a path for [...]

Continue Reading

During the days of Prohibition, an unlikely coalition formed between bootleggers and Baptist. Both groups supported the Eighteenth Amendment, albeit for very different reasons. Baptist saw alcohol as a vile intoxicant that ruined families; bootleggers were able to exact higher prices for their illicit liquor without competition from legal retailers.

Today, another unlikely coalition is [...]

Continue Reading

In mid-February, Airbnb will begin to collect hotel taxes in four more cities: Washington, D.C., Chicago, San Jose, and Amsterdam. The short-term home rental service has been collecting taxes in Portland, Oregon and San Francisco for about a year now.

The company allows users to list their home for rent for any amount of [...]

Continue Reading

On Tuesday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued an Enforcement Advisory that notified businesses that blocking personal WiFi networks, or “hotspots,” is illegal and in violation of Section 333 of the Communications Act. Such actions, the FCC warned, “could lead to the assessment of substantial monetary penalties.”

This warning comes after the [...]

Continue Reading

A recent case involving the United States Drug Enforcement Administration ended in a settlement this past Tuesday. As discussed in a previous blog post, the federal government has been repeatedly criticized for using controversial impersonation methods in connection with criminal investigations. In this case, a woman whose identity was allegedly used by a [...]

Continue Reading

After a startling revelation on the first day, the trial of Ross Ulbricht, the alleged Dread Pirate Roberts continues this week. On day one of the trial, Ulbricht’s defense attorney conceded that yes, Ross Ulbricht did indeed start the notorious Silk Road market.

Silk Road was intended to be, as portrayed by Ulbricht’s defense counsel, [...]

Continue Reading

Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

Continue Reading

Although the Supreme Court has held that police officers must obtain a warrant in order to search a suspect’s cell phone upon arrest, not all police departments have gotten on board. At least one California Highway Patrol officer has been accused of stealing nude photographs [...]

Continue Reading

EMV Cards Finally Coming to the US

On October 30, 2014 By Sara Hunter

On October 17, 2014, just days before Staples announced that it was investigating a “potential [security] issue,” President Obama signed an executive order to accelerate EMV adoption in the United States.

The hacking trend first began in November of 2013 when—a few days before Thanksgiving—Target’s security and payments system was hacked. In the first [...]

Continue Reading

A Hollywood lawyer representing Jennifer Lawrence, Kristen Dunst, and Kate Upton accused Google of taking “little or no action” to remove the recent hacked nude photos and even facilitating their dispersal, in a letter sent Wednesday threatening a $100 million lawsuit.

Entertainment lawyer Martin Singer–known in the industry as Continue Reading