Currently viewing the tag: "privacy"

Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

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Although the Supreme Court has held that police officers must obtain a warrant in order to search a suspect’s cell phone upon arrest, not all police departments have gotten on board. At least one California Highway Patrol officer has been accused of stealing nude photographs [...]

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EMV Cards Finally Coming to the US

On October 30, 2014 By Sara Hunter

On October 17, 2014, just days before Staples announced that it was investigating a “potential [security] issue,” President Obama signed an executive order to accelerate EMV adoption in the United States.

The hacking trend first began in November of 2013 when—a few days before Thanksgiving—Target’s security and payments system was hacked. In the first [...]

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A Hollywood lawyer representing Jennifer Lawrence, Kristen Dunst, and Kate Upton accused Google of taking “little or no action” to remove the recent hacked nude photos and even facilitating their dispersal, in a letter sent Wednesday threatening a $100 million lawsuit.

Entertainment lawyer Martin Singer–known in the industry as Continue Reading

With last week’s announcement of the new iPhone 6 and Apple Watch, the tech giant has come under scrutiny from lawmakers, regulators, and the general public. Just one week after Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive officer, introduced the company’s latest offerings, Apple is seemingly running damage control. This may come as no surprise (to [...]

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US Magazine and People are no longer the only sources revealing intimate details about the private lives of celebrities. Over the holiday weekend, hundreds of nude celebrity photos were made available to a few million more than their intended audience. Among the stars hacked were Kate Upton, Kirsten Dunst, and most notably, Jennifer Lawrence.

The [...]

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Earlier this year, Facebook agreed to purchase the startup messaging company WhatsApp for $19 billion. WhatsApp has become hugely popular in the last few years due to its instant messaging capability, but without the usual carrier fees associated with text messaging, its compatibility with all major mobile operating systems, and its [...]

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On August 11, 2014, the California Senate passed cellular phone anti-theft legislation, sending it to Governor Jerry Brown to be signed into law.  The bill, SB 962, mandates that any smartphone built and distributed in California after July 1, 2015 must have a “technological solution” that would prevent new [...]

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The United States Supreme Court recently decided Riley v. California. Two separate Amici Curiae briefs petitioning for Writ of Certiorari  (available here and herecited a note published by the Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology, continuing the journal’s impressive rise to the [...]

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The Eleventh Circuit handed down a groundbreaking decision this past week, holding in United States v. Davis that the Fourth Amendment protects information about a person’s cell site data.

Cell site data reveals a cellphone’s physical address at call origination, duration, and termination. In Davis, that information was provided [...]

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