Currently viewing the tag: "privacy"

Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 16, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Was that bribery? There’s an app for that! Latham & Watkins releases an app detailing anti-corruption and bribery statutes across many countries. [H/T Law Technology News] False advertising claims (some of them, anyway) against Frito-Lay, based on an “All-Natural” label applied to GMO products, survive. [H/T @rtushnet] After [...]

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California Seeks to Criminalize “Revenge Porn”

On September 10, 2013 By Thomas McFarland

In today’s digital world it has become quite common for jilted lovers to publish intimate photos and videos of their ex-significant other on the web in the aftermath of a contentious breakup. The growth in popularity of so-called “revenge porn” has led to the emergence of pornographic websites wholly dedicated to the material. These [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 9, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

The New York Times breaks a story alleging that the Drug Enforcement Agency has been working very closely with AT&T to access a database of phone records going as far back as 1987. According to the story, the DEA pays AT&T to station several of the company’s employees inside DEA investigative units to [...]

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In the past year we have learned that the NSA collects information about our phone calls without using a warrant. We have also discovered that the FBI may be asking phone companies to track our calls, that camera-carrying drones are becoming more popular with businesses–and with teenagers who may use them to peer through each [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 2, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

A bill passed in New Zealand effectively bans software patents by labeling them ‘not inventions.’ A newly invented process, implemented in software, would still be patentable, but the software that implements it would not itself be patentable. Will this square New Zealand’s goal with the TRIPS Agreement’s requirement that patents be available [...]

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Automatic License Plate Readers allow governments and private corporations to keep track of the location and occupants of millions of vehicles simultaneously, with very little effort. The basic technology is nothing new: It was invented in 1976 and was already leading to arrests by 1981. However, as with many other types of technological advances, [...]

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Since Google-Glass was first announced, it seems there has been no shortage of controversy surrounding the cutting-edge device. From privacy concerns to concerns the device would cause Continue Reading

Wednesday Morning JETLawg

On August 28, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

There were a lot of items this week, so we are publishing an additional JETLawg:

Confirming that we have one foot in the utopian and one foot in the dystopian future, credit card thieves in Australia are apparently using 3D printers to make virtually undetectable ATM skimmers. These devices “skim” copies of the magnetic [...]

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Proxy servers, like other technologies that facilitate anonymity, serve both good and bad interests. On the one hand, they have helped people living under oppressive regimes view otherwise-censored content. On the other hand, they are used to facilitate criminal activity, including terrorist attacks. The function of a proxy server is not complicated: you [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 26, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Lawrence Lessig sued the publisher of Phoenix’s song Lisztomania for declaratory relief, claiming fair use for his inclusion of fans’ response videos (which were set to the the song) in a lecture posted to YouTube. He has some of the four fair use factors in his favor, including effect [...]

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