Currently viewing the tag: "privacy"

Automatic License Plate Readers allow governments and private corporations to keep track of the location and occupants of millions of vehicles simultaneously, with very little effort. The basic technology is nothing new: It was invented in 1976 and was already leading to arrests by 1981. However, as with many other types of technological advances, [...]

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Since Google-Glass was first announced, it seems there has been no shortage of controversy surrounding the cutting-edge device. From privacy concerns to concerns the device would cause Continue Reading

Wednesday Morning JETLawg

On August 28, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

There were a lot of items this week, so we are publishing an additional JETLawg:

Confirming that we have one foot in the utopian and one foot in the dystopian future, credit card thieves in Australia are apparently using 3D printers to make virtually undetectable ATM skimmers. These devices “skim” copies of the magnetic [...]

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Proxy servers, like other technologies that facilitate anonymity, serve both good and bad interests. On the one hand, they have helped people living under oppressive regimes view otherwise-censored content. On the other hand, they are used to facilitate criminal activity, including terrorist attacks. The function of a proxy server is not complicated: you [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 26, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Lawrence Lessig sued the publisher of Phoenix’s song Lisztomania for declaratory relief, claiming fair use for his inclusion of fans’ response videos (which were set to the the song) in a lecture posted to YouTube. He has some of the four fair use factors in his favor, including effect [...]

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About a Beauty Queen and a RAT

On August 23, 2013 By Zachary Loney

 

Cassidy Wolf, the current Miss Teen USA, recently came forward claiming to be the victim of the latest and highest profile “sextortion” attempt to hit the media. Sextortion is a form of exploitation that employs non-physical coercion to extort sexual acts and favors from the victim. [...]

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California is proving to be a hotbed for mobile app privacy litigation. Its attorney general has developed mobile app privacy guidelines [PDF] to help app developers, app platform providers, advertising networks, and others understand the state’s privacy requirements. Last fall, it notified dozens of app developers that they had failed to [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On August 19, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Welcome to the fall 2013 season of JETLaw blogging! We will resume regular entertainment, technology, and intellectual property law blogging this week.

The Snowden leaks continued with the Washington Post, this time revealing (alleged) NSA documents that show an internal audit revealing thousands of unauthorized policy violations in the course [...]

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Drone Hunting

On July 25, 2013 By Kimberly Smith

Are domestic drones set to become the prey of Colorado hunters? If one resident of Deer Trail, Colorado gets his way, the answer is yes. The FAA is not expected to release regulations on the domestic use of drones until 2015, but this small town is taking a preemptive (if [...]

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The recent events surrounding Edward Snowden and the NSA surveillance program are bringing domestic law enforcement surveillance into the public consciousness. In particular, the implications of Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs), used by law enforcement agencies all over the country, are being reevaluated.

The recently implemented technology consists of a camera linked to a processing [...]

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