Currently viewing the tag: "progress"

Recently, efforts have been growing to urge the Washington Redskins to change their name due to the offensive connotations it carries toward Native Americans. We have covered the issue extensively, from trademark battles to growing outrage. President Obama, lawmakers, civil rights groups, and tribal organizations have expressed their endorsement of a name change.  [...]

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Punishing Prenda

On November 11, 2013 By J.P. Urban

Many of you are quite familiar with the “world’s most famous porn pirate hunters,” but if you need a refresher, check out Parker Hancock’s post from earlier this year before reading on. Since that post, the law firm that tried to shame those pornography consumers has had a tough time in court.

First, internet [...]

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Wednesday Morning JETLawg

On October 16, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

 

Once again we had many news items this week, so we are posting a second round-up. We found a number of legal technology projects attempting to change the way laws are made, interpreted, and complied with far into the future.

Legal Technology:

How will lawmaking, legal education, and legal practice look in fifty [...]

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At the end of August, the GAO finally issued its mandated report to Congress regarding factors that affect patent infringement litigation. Why? Patent litigation has increased dramatically over the past decade. From 2000-2011, over 29,000 patent suits were filed in U.S. district courts, and the overall number of defendants in these cases [...]

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Hacking the Legal Profession

On August 29, 2013 By Zac Parsons

Hackers are coming after the legal profession. Run! Hide! Or join them?

The term ‘hacker’ is being used in a growing numbers of circles, and not in reference to some sort of scene from a movie about a coder (or group of coders) accessing data without authorization. This new connotation of [...]

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For the past five years, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)’s Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) has been discussing proposed exceptions to the copyright reproductions rights that would help the visually impaired and those with other print disabilities. The problem is obvious: there are millions of individuals across [...]

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DNA’s Month in Court

On June 21, 2013 By Jeffrey W. Sheehan

June has been an interesting month for DNA at the Supreme Court and for technology and the law generally.  Justice Scalia demonstrated his own signature brand of judicial restraint by declining to sign on to those aspects of last Thursday’s Myriad Genetics decision that explained “fine details of molecular biology.”  [...]

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If you’re unfamiliar, Airbnb is like a mix of eBay and Couchsurfing: people list their property on the site, and vacationers rent that property. Property owners can make money when they’re not at home, and vacationers have more choice when visiting a city—a win-win, or most would think. Of course, being a stranger-to-stranger [...]

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Law on Google Glass Less than Clear

On April 1, 2013 By Kendall Short

Lawmakers in West Virginia have proposed a new bill that bans wearing the new Google Glass device while driving.  (For background info on this high-tech headpiece, see fellow blogger Katie Kuhn’s post.)  The bill would subject drivers who use “a wearable computer with a head-mounted display” to a fine.

Apparently prompted by a Continue Reading

On Tuesday, September 25, at Google’s Mountain View headquarters, California governor Jerry Brown signed a law legalizing the testing of driverless cars on public roads.  While California is not the first state to legalize driverless cars, this step is significant because the state’s large consumer market often drives innovation in [...]

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