Currently viewing the tag: "social networking"

This past Thursday, Twitter announced (through a tweet, of course!) that it has initiated the process for an initial public offering.  In the past few days, there has been much speculation about the potential effects of Twitter’s I.P.O.

Some articles, including one in the New York Times, express [...]

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Over the past few years, courts and litigants have grappled with vexing evidentiary issues concerning when and how private social media content (particularly Facebook and Twitter postings) should be turned over in discovery. During this time, courts have proposed, adopted, modified, and discarded a number of different paradigms and rules for dealing with these disputes. [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 2, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

A bill passed in New Zealand effectively bans software patents by labeling them ‘not inventions.’ A newly invented process, implemented in software, would still be patentable, but the software that implements it would not itself be patentable. Will this square New Zealand’s goal with the TRIPS Agreement’s requirement that patents be available [...]

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Kathryn Brown’s Student Note, The Risks of Taking Facebook at Face Value: Why the Psychology of Social Networking Should Influence the Evidentiary Relevance of Facebook Photographs, was cited by U.S. Magistrate Judge A. Kathleen Tomlinson in Giacchetto v. Patchogue-Medford Union Free Sch. Dist., No. 2:11-cv-06323 (ADS) (AKT), 2013 WL 2897054, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 83341 (E.D.N.Y. [...]

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If you’re unfamiliar, Airbnb is like a mix of eBay and Couchsurfing: people list their property on the site, and vacationers rent that property. Property owners can make money when they’re not at home, and vacationers have more choice when visiting a city—a win-win, or most would think. Of course, being a stranger-to-stranger [...]

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Your Phone Just Called. It’s Tracking You.

On April 9, 2013 By Tim Van Hal

Just last week, a new report published in Nature’s Scientific Reports confirmed what many already knew and some feared: mobile devices can be used to identify people regardless of whether the information was “anonymized.” That is right: your phone and its data, even if it is touted as “anonymous,” can be used to [...]

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As has been repeatedly reported in the media over the past few years, online postings are becoming common sources of evidence in divorce and other family law litigation. This article will discuss recent studies and surveys that have examined the increased use of online postings as evidence in divorce cases, as well as how courts [...]

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Blurry Future for Google Glass

On April 3, 2013 By Michael Silliman

Google’s new augmented reality device “Google Glass” is promising, to say the least. The head-mounted computer boasts the ability to take pictures, record videos, start Google Hangouts, and get turn-by-turn directions, all through a visual overlay controlled by voice commands. (For more on the technology itself [...]

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So far, 2013 has been anticlimactic for litigators waiting for an authoritative appellate decision addressing the rules of social media discovery. Although state and federal trial courts have established some basic parameters regarding the accessibility of private social content in litigation, there remains a conspicuous lack of appellate court guidance on the [...]

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For most Americans, the Newtown tragedy served as a gut-wrenching reminder that life is precious.  The massacre instantly brought communities together, prompting thousands of citizens to publicize condolences and donate to Newtown-related charities.  However, according to three Congress members from Connecticut, many Facebook tribute pages have [...]

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