Currently viewing the tag: "Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS)"

Monday Morning JETLawg

On February 3, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Surveillance:

Tech companies win the right to report government data requests (like national security letters) in greater detail. Rand Paul plans on taking his lawsuit against the NSA to the Supreme Court. [via The Hill] The NSA hires its first Privacy and Civil Liberties Officer. [via SANSSC Magazine]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On January 27, 2014 By Bradlee Edmondson

Patent Eligibility Symposium Wrap-Up

On Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, JETLaw hosted its 2013-2014 symposium, Patents 101: From Computer Code to Genetic Codes, focusing on what, exactly, is eligible for patent protection. Chief Judge Randall Rader of the Federal Circuit delivered the keynote address, and panels addressed software patents, gene patents, and principles of patent [...]

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Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International

In 2005, the Australian company Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. filed a patent application with the US Patent and Trademark Office for a method of reducing financial risk by ensuring, through “data processing systems” and third-party exchanges, that counterparties make good on their obligations. In 2010, [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 14, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Privacy & Social Media:

California creates a minor’s right to be forgotten online. (In contrast, the EU Court of Justice found in June that EU law contains no general right to be forgotten.) [H/T Privacy, E-Commerce & Data Security's Summer 2013 Newsletter (PDF)] Google may be getting ready to use your [...]

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Pharmaceutical companies, the Federal Trade Commission, and antitrust and intellectual property attorneys waited with bated breath for the Supreme Court’s monumental decision on the legality of reverse-payment settlements, announced in FTC v. Actavis. On June 17, 2013, everyone got their answer… or did they?

What happened?

In March, this blog outlined [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On June 17, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

In the Ninth Circuit, Google argues that the Wiretap Act does not prohibit interception of unencrypted wireless transmissions. The Supreme Court unanimously rules in Myriad that isolated DNA is not patentable, while cDNA is. [H/T PatentlyO; SCOTUSBlog] Monsanto keeps farmers who were worried about inadvertent infringement out of court. [...]

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Typically in patent litigation, the patent holder bears the burden of proving that the defendant infringed.  The Federal Circuit recently created a limited exception to that rule in Medtronic, Inc. v. Boston Scientific Corp. (Fed. Cir. 2012) (PDF). It held that when a licensee in good standing seeks a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, [...]

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First Sale Gone Wild

On March 25, 2013 By Raymond Rufat

Have you ever been in the market for a textbook? If so, you, like most students enrolled in college these days, were probably shocked by some of the exorbitant prices that university bookstores charge for a book. For example, if you were in the market for a brand new Constitutional Law textbook you would be [...]

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On Tuesday, January 10, the Supreme Court heard a case regarding the Federal Communication Commision (FCC) and its regulations preventing networks from airing indecent programming or profane language. The Supreme Court seemed to side with the FCC but will not issue a final opinion until July.

This is actually the second time [...]

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