Currently viewing the tag: "Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS)"

Pharmaceutical companies, the Federal Trade Commission, and antitrust and intellectual property attorneys waited with bated breath for the Supreme Court’s monumental decision on the legality of reverse-payment settlements, announced in FTC v. Actavis. On June 17, 2013, everyone got their answer… or did they?

What happened?

In March, this blog outlined [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On June 17, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

In the Ninth Circuit, Google argues that the Wiretap Act does not prohibit interception of unencrypted wireless transmissions. The Supreme Court unanimously rules in Myriad that isolated DNA is not patentable, while cDNA is. [H/T PatentlyO; SCOTUSBlog] Monsanto keeps farmers who were worried about inadvertent infringement out of court. [...]

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Typically in patent litigation, the patent holder bears the burden of proving that the defendant infringed.  The Federal Circuit recently created a limited exception to that rule in Medtronic, Inc. v. Boston Scientific Corp. (Fed. Cir. 2012) (PDF). It held that when a licensee in good standing seeks a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, [...]

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First Sale Gone Wild

On March 25, 2013 By Raymond Rufat

Have you ever been in the market for a textbook? If so, you, like most students enrolled in college these days, were probably shocked by some of the exorbitant prices that university bookstores charge for a book. For example, if you were in the market for a brand new Constitutional Law textbook you would be [...]

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On Tuesday, January 10, the Supreme Court heard a case regarding the Federal Communication Commision (FCC) and its regulations preventing networks from airing indecent programming or profane language. The Supreme Court seemed to side with the FCC but will not issue a final opinion until July.

This is actually the second time [...]

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In the upcoming October term, the Supreme Court will weigh in on the issue of whether police may use GPS tracking devices to watch over the movements of suspected criminals without first obtaining a warrant, or whether such activity violates an individual’s Fourth Amendment rights.  Currently, the Seventh and [...]

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Do You Password Protect Your Cellphone?

On January 27, 2011 By Kevin Lumpkin

In the United States, citizens are guaranteed protection from unreasonable search and seizure by the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution. But as anyone who’s looked into Fourth Amendment jurisprudence will tell you, the most important word in that analysis is unreasonable. Courts around the country have developed a wide range of categories that [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On January 24, 2011 By JETLaw

In the news. . .

Legal fight over song from “The Fighter” causes trouble for CBS, Beck, the NFL, and Busta Rhymes, among others.

Originally proposed by the telecommunications giant, Verizon now opposes FCC’s net neutrality rules.

IFPI music report sheds new light on impact piracy has on recording [...]

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Yesterday the Supreme Court heard opening oral arguments in the case of Schwarzenegger v. The Entertainment Merchants Association and Entertainment Software Association, a case that could decide the legal status of video games.

The California law at issue would levy fines against retailers who rent or sell video games depicting “especially heinous, cruel, or depraved violence, such [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On October 4, 2010 By JETLaw

In the news…

Second Circuit rules pure music download not a “public performance” under copyright law in U.S. v. ASCAP.

New anti-piracy legislation seeks to get Google on board to stop websites that promote copyright infringement.

Death of student, Tyler Clementi, raises new issues for technology on college campuses.

[...]

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