Currently viewing the tag: "technology"

Modification and optimization of human behavior is one of the law’s fundamental aims. Criminal law schemes contemplate deterrence and utilitarian rationales; the law of torts is designed to internalize externalities, compensate for damage, and otherwise incentivize efficient actions; the laws of contracts and corporations are structured to facilitate more efficient transactions, and so on. On [...]

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Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

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Facebook has 1.23 billion monthly users. From among these users, 7.5 million are children. To many children, Facebook is a medium to share their thoughts and photos without oversight or restraint from their parents. In fact, in their use of Facebook, many children even refuse to be “friends” with their parents. But for [...]

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With new technology come new products, new opportunities, and—unfortunately—new problems.  Few technologies pose quite the excitement, and potential for legal complication, as 3D printing.  3D printing, a technique that manufactures goods using thin layers of plastic based on written computer programs, has the potential to revolutionizeevery major industry in the world.  However, as Yoshitomo Imura [...]

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EMV Cards Finally Coming to the US

On October 30, 2014 By Sara Hunter

On October 17, 2014, just days before Staples announced that it was investigating a “potential [security] issue,” President Obama signed an executive order to accelerate EMV adoption in the United States.

The hacking trend first began in November of 2013 when—a few days before Thanksgiving—Target’s security and payments system was hacked. In the first [...]

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GUEST POST BY:
ARIA C. SAFAR

I recently attended a conference in Portland, Oregon dedicated to the preservation of legal data in the case of litigation. Legal technology conferences are always an interesting mix of keeping up to date with “old” technology developments (at least a few years [...]

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The Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (MDA), to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA), divide medical devices into three classes according to user risk. Class I devices pose the least risk; Class III devices pose the most. Class I devices are subject to general controls such as labeling requirements. Class II devices are subject to [...]

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On September 30th, eBay announced that it will adopt a new business strategy—break up the company by spinning off PayPal.  This comes six months after one of eBay’s investors, Carl Icahn, first suggested this strategic move.  After the breakup is complete, PayPal will be a separate publicly traded company, free to [...]

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Amid the backdrop of last week’s People’s Climate March and the UN Climate Change Summit, tech giants Facebook and Google have cut ties with the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). The companies cite the lobbying group’s stance on climate change–i.e., denial–as the reason.

ALEC is a Koch-funded, right-wing think tank [...]

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Alibaba: King of Retail?

On September 30, 2014 By Mike Sellner

Alibaba, the Asia-based online marketplace similar to the American site Amazon.com, went public on Friday, September 19, 2014.  The initial public offering raised over $21 million on the first day of sales.  As of Wednesday, September 25, the offering reached over $25 million raised, making it the largest IPO of all time, beating [...]

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