Currently viewing the tag: "technology"

In mid-February, Airbnb will begin to collect hotel taxes in four more cities: Washington, D.C., Chicago, San Jose, and Amsterdam. The short-term home rental service has been collecting taxes in Portland, Oregon and San Francisco for about a year now.

The company allows users to list their home for rent for any amount of [...]

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On Tuesday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued an Enforcement Advisory that notified businesses that blocking personal WiFi networks, or “hotspots,” is illegal and in violation of Section 333 of the Communications Act. Such actions, the FCC warned, “could lead to the assessment of substantial monetary penalties.”

This warning comes after the [...]

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With more and more police departments purchasing body cameras and adopting policies that officers wear these cameras at all times when on duty, one is left wondering what will the effects on the criminal justice system be?

Departments that have implemented the use of body cameras have achieved staggering results.  The police department in [...]

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Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System has been getting a lot of media attention lately. Unfortunately, the coverage hasn’t totally been focused on reliable and affordable clean energy.

The facility, located in the Mojave Desert, is the largest solar “power tower” system in the world. Among its advertised benefits, the company’s website promises to avoid [...]

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Last week, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) released a plan for electric monitoring and reporting in its Southeast fisheries, marking a significant step towards regulatory agencies embracing technology to better protect and manage the environment. The plan’s goal is to provide more timely, accurate, and comprehensive data for fisheries management and science.

Successful [...]

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Modification and optimization of human behavior is one of the law’s fundamental aims. Criminal law schemes contemplate deterrence and utilitarian rationales; the law of torts is designed to internalize externalities, compensate for damage, and otherwise incentivize efficient actions; the laws of contracts and corporations are structured to facilitate more efficient transactions, and so on. On [...]

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Online Impersonation

On November 7, 2014 By Allison Laubach

Earlier this week, ACLU analyst Christopher Soghoian discovered that in 2007, the FBI impersonated the Seattle Times while investigating bomb threats made to a school in Lacey, Washington. The bureau was using a technique commonly referred to as “phishing” to monitor a juvenile after receiving tips that he was behind the threats. The FBI obtained [...]

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Facebook has 1.23 billion monthly users. From among these users, 7.5 million are children. To many children, Facebook is a medium to share their thoughts and photos without oversight or restraint from their parents. In fact, in their use of Facebook, many children even refuse to be “friends” with their parents. But for [...]

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With new technology come new products, new opportunities, and—unfortunately—new problems.  Few technologies pose quite the excitement, and potential for legal complication, as 3D printing.  3D printing, a technique that manufactures goods using thin layers of plastic based on written computer programs, has the potential to revolutionizeevery major industry in the world.  However, as Yoshitomo Imura [...]

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EMV Cards Finally Coming to the US

On October 30, 2014 By Sara Hunter

On October 17, 2014, just days before Staples announced that it was investigating a “potential [security] issue,” President Obama signed an executive order to accelerate EMV adoption in the United States.

The hacking trend first began in November of 2013 when—a few days before Thanksgiving—Target’s security and payments system was hacked. In the first [...]

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