Currently viewing the tag: "technology"

The Target: Protecting Consumers’ Data

On January 22, 2014 By Rebecca Loegering

Over the holiday season, Target suffered a highly publicized data breach affecting between 70 and 110 million customers, one of the largest breaches of retail data in history. This personally identifiable data was hacked, according to Target executives, by malware installed on point-of-sale devices in Target’s checkout lines. The malicious software — [...]

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This summer the Los Angeles Police Department hopes to outfit 600 of its officers with on-body video cameras. The cameras, unlike the picture at left, resemble a bluetooth ear piece and would attach to the officer’s collar or sunglasses. Funding for the project has been secured from private donors, with the department raising [...]

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Aereo Heads to the Supreme Court

On January 16, 2014 By Brenan Salgado

On Friday, January 10, the Supreme Court granted cert to the major broadcasters’ challenge to Aereo. This follows on the heels of a recent ruling questioning the legality of Aereo’s (and, increasingly, other TV-over-internet service providers’) business models.

Aereo’s TV-over-internet technology captures over-the-air digital television broadcasts and relays them as [...]

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I had originally planned on making this a video post. I thought it might be interesting to discuss how media portrayals of crime have changed, using a video of Rockstar Game’s Grand Theft Auto V to ground my commentary. However, when I uploaded the video to YouTube, it got flagged for copyright [...]

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Privatizing the Surveillance State

On January 14, 2014 By Brooke McLeod

While the public is increasingly uncomfortable with the idea of government cameras and Internet snoops recording their daily behavior, Americans seem much more willing to routinely monitoring people, pets, or handymen.

People have had security cameras aimed at garage doors or novelty cameras aimed at ocean views for years. However, cameras that transmit images over [...]

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Thanks to our authors for a great semester full of legal analysis across intellectual property, entertainment, and technology law. This will be our last regularly scheduled post of the semester. We head into final exams right after the Thanksgiving break. Good luck, everyone!

Google announces that it will Continue Reading

Instant Replay for Baseball — and Squad Cars

On November 22, 2013 By Ryan Loofbourrow

An umpire’s job is to get the call right. However, when a manager disagrees with a call that a Major League Baseball (MLB) umpire makes, he has no recourse. Managers are often seen running out of the dugout, yelling at the umpire, kicking dirt on the umpire’s shoes, and, all too often, getting themselves [...]

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Google Books is Fair Use

On November 18, 2013 By Erin Shackelford

 

This week, Google dodged a multi-billion dollar bullet. After a nine-year legal battle, Google secured a victory against the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers. The author’s advocates filed a copyright infringement suit against Google in 2004 after it announced its “Google [...]

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Snapchat: Handing Over Unopened Snaps to Police

On November 15, 2013 By Mary Fletcher King

Snapchat, the photo-sharing mobile application that initially had a reputation for facilitating “safe” sexting due to the timed deletion of sent images, has been a prominent subject in both technological and legal news. From warnings to users that recipients could screenshot and save the photographs to arrests of teachers engaging in racy snap exchanges [...]

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Bitcoin security, Liberty Reserve money laundering, open source law and legal information, and tech industry

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