Currently viewing the tag: "technology"

Pizza Delivery Drone: Convenience Versus Privacy

On November 13, 2013 By Sonal Patel

I think we can breathe a sigh of relief knowing that drone safety is on the radar. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) released a long-term roadmap [PDF] delineating the specific requirements for the use of domestic drones. Drones are the talk of the town — they often show up in the news in a [...]

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There was a lot going on this week, so the Monday Morning JETLawg has been broken down into topics. Monday is cybercrime and cybersecurity; Tuesday is copyright, intellectual property (IP) policy generally, government technology, and government IP; Wednesday is surveillance and censorship; Thursday is sports, entertainment, and the arts; and Friday is e-currency, e-discovery, [...]

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Punishing Prenda

On November 11, 2013 By J.P. Urban

Many of you are quite familiar with the “world’s most famous porn pirate hunters,” but if you need a refresher, check out Parker Hancock’s post from earlier this year before reading on. Since that post, the law firm that tried to shame those pornography consumers has had a tough time in court.

First, internet [...]

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There was a lot going on this week, so the Monday Morning JETLawg has been broken down into topics. Monday is cybercrime and cybersecurity; Tuesday is copyright, intellectual property (IP) policy generally, government technology, and government IP; Wednesday is surveillance and censorship; Thursday is sports, entertainment, and the arts; [...]

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Have you ever turned on the TV to watch your beloved (fill-in-the-blank) professional football team, only to discover your local cable network is not broadcasting the home game? Unfortunately, this is not an error on the part of your cable provider. Rather, this is the effect of a contractual agreement between [...]

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The 2013-2014 JETLaw Symposium, “Patents 101: Eligibility from Computer Code to Genetic Codes” will be held at Vanderbilt Law School on Friday, January 24th, 2014. The Symposium examines the interaction of Section 101 and patent eligibility of software and DNA, as well as the implication of current jurisprudence on patent eligible [...]

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Facebook: Moving Forward with Violence

On October 28, 2013 By Sarah Robbins

Facebook announces a more “holistic” approach to removing violent media (despite outright ban on nudity/drugs/etc.).

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Do Supreme Court Justices Dream of Electric Sheep?

On October 24, 2013 By Thomas Hayden

Back in June, the Supreme Court decided Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, 569 U.S. ___, 133 S. Ct. 2107 (2013) (which we previously wrote about here). Myriad was a unanimous decision in which the Court ruled that naturally occurring isolated DNA cannot be patented, but that [...]

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Almost Half of Supreme Court Links Don’t Work

On October 23, 2013 By Michael Griffin

It should come as no surprise that Supreme Court Justices are not the most tech-savvy bunch. After all, they still haven’t “really gotten into email.” But maybe that’s for the best. In at least one instance, the Court’s foray into new technology has been shaky.

According to a new study [...]

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Ed O’Bannon’s four-year-long lawsuit made a huge step a few weeks ago when O’Bannon and EA agreed on a settlement (previously discussed here). The settlement was a big win for the plaintiffs but also for student-athletes in general. It is one step closer to athletes being able to [...]

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