Currently viewing the tag: "telecommunications"

Led by actress Halle Berry, celebrity parents scored a major victory last week against tabloid photographers when California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bill that increases penalties for “harassment” of children due to their parents’ jobs. To drive home the message of the new legislation, the bill amended the current law’s definition of [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 30, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

U.S.-Iranian Twitter diplomacy, LexisNexis and Dun & Bradstreet are hacked, NSA employees cyberstalk lovers, and NSA reform bills

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 23, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

Patent trolls, NSA, FTC, oh my!

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Verizon Seeks to Close Down FCC’s Open Internet

On September 11, 2013 By Lizzie Maratea

“Does the US government have any role in ensuring ubiquitous, open, world-class, interconnected, reasonably-priced Internet access?” For Susan Crawford, co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard and a professor at Yeshiva University’s Cardozo School of Law, the question is rhetorical. Obviously, yes. It [...]

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Monday Morning JETLawg

On September 9, 2013 By Bradlee Edmondson

The New York Times breaks a story alleging that the Drug Enforcement Agency has been working very closely with AT&T to access a database of phone records going as far back as 1987. According to the story, the DEA pays AT&T to station several of the company’s employees inside DEA investigative units to [...]

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Silicon Valley Strikes Back

On September 3, 2013 By Richard Saunders

As more information regarding the NSA’s surveillance program, dubbed X-Keyscore, trickles into the public domain, technology industry titans continue their battle with the government for increased transparency of national security requests.

Until recently, the full extent of domestic surveillance was largely unknown due to a closely guarded, secret surveillance request process. All surveillance requests [...]

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Your Phone Just Called. It’s Tracking You.

On April 9, 2013 By Tim Van Hal

Just last week, a new report published in Nature’s Scientific Reports confirmed what many already knew and some feared: mobile devices can be used to identify people regardless of whether the information was “anonymized.” That is right: your phone and its data, even if it is touted as “anonymous,” can be used to [...]

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People go to the theatre to get away from it all–but what happens when the troubles of the outside world intrude on New York’s greatest escape? Deficit hawks and government bureaucracy alike have found a new target, albeit inadvertently: Broadway theatres.  Theaters everywhere rely on wireless microphones not only to communicate lighting cues, [...]

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A few weeks back, Cecilia Kang at the Washington Post reported that the FCC plans to propose universal free WiFi.  Kang added that, on one side, the wireless industry “has launched a fierce lobbying effort to persuade policymakers to reconsider the idea,” and on the other side, Google and Microsoft [...]

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This Call May Be Monitored…

On November 16, 2012 By Emma Stephens

The Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in Clapper v. Amnesty International USA, a case on appeal from the Second Circuit in which the Court will address whether a group including lawyers, journalists, and civil liberties advocates possesses Article III standing in a suit seeking relief against the federal government’s ongoing warrantless wiretapping [...]

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